A natural gene drive system influences bovine tuberculosis susceptibility in African buffalo : possible implications for disease management

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dc.contributor.author Van Hooft, Pim
dc.contributor.author Getz, Wayne M.
dc.contributor.author Greyling, Barend Jacobus
dc.contributor.author Bastos, Armanda D.S.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-12-02T05:23:48Z
dc.date.available 2019-12-02T05:23:48Z
dc.date.issued 2019-09-04
dc.description S1 Text. Sex chromosomal meiotic drive can explain genome-wide high-frequency occurrence of male-deleterious alleles. en_ZA
dc.description S2 Text. Frequency differences of DEmajority and SAEpooled alleles between HiP and Kruger. en_ZA
dc.description S1 Fig. Map with sampling localities. en_ZA
dc.description S2 Fig. Monthly rainfall in HiP. en_ZA
dc.description S3 Fig. Annual rainfall in HiP in the period 1979–2004. en_ZA
dc.description S4 Fig. Frequencies of DEmajority and SAEpooled alleles in HiP compared with Kruger. en_ZA
dc.description S5 Fig. Difference in Amale-spec between SAEindvN alleles from Kruger observed and not observed in HIP. en_ZA
dc.description S6 Fig. Allele frequency differences between northern Kruger and HiP per SAE allele type. en_ZA
dc.description S1 Table. List of SAEpooled and DEmajority alleles. en_ZA
dc.description S2 Table. List of individual alleles at the DE microsatellite loci. en_ZA
dc.description S3 Table. List of individual alleles at the SAE microsatellite loci. en_ZA
dc.description S4 Table. List of individual alleles at the SAE microsatellite loci with unknown linkage. en_ZA
dc.description S5 Table. Logistic regression of BTB-infection risk for each sex separately. en_ZA
dc.description S6 Table. Logistic regression of BTB-infection risk for dry and wet pre-birth years separately. en_ZA
dc.description S7 Table. Logistic regression between sex (dependent) and age and 3yr-pre-birth rainfall. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is endemic to the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) of HluhluweiMfolozi Park (HiP) and Kruger National Park, South Africa. In HiP, the disease has been actively managed since 1999 through a test-and-cull procedure targeting BTB-positive buffalo. Prior studies in Kruger showed associations between microsatellite alleles, BTB and body condition. A sex chromosomal meiotic drive, a form of natural gene drive, was hypothesized to be ultimately responsible. These associations indicate high-frequency occurrence of two types of male-deleterious alleles (or multiple-allele haplotypes). One type negatively affects body condition and BTB resistance in both sexes. The other type has sexually antagonistic effects: negative in males but positive in females. Here, we investigate whether a similar gene drive system is present in HiP buffalo, using 17 autosomal microsatellites and microsatellite-derived Y-chromosomal haplotypes from 401 individuals, culled in 2002– 2004. We show that the association between autosomal microsatellite alleles and BTB susceptibility detected in Kruger, is also present in HiP. Further, Y-haplotype frequency dynamics indicated that a sex chromosomal meiotic drive also occurred in HiP. BTB was associated with negative selection of male-deleterious alleles in HiP, unlike positive selection in Kruger. Birth sex ratios were female-biased. We attribute negative selection and female-biased sex ratios in HiP to the absence of a Y-chromosomal sex-ratio distorter. This distorter has been hypothesized to contribute to positive selection of male-deleterious alleles and male-biased birth sex ratios in Kruger. As previously shown in Kruger, microsatellite alleles were only associated with male-deleterious effects in individuals born after wet pre-birth years; a phenomenon attributed to epigenetic modification. We identified two additional allele types: male-specific deleterious and beneficial alleles, with no discernible effect on females. Finally, we discuss how our findings may be used for breeding disease-free buffalo and implementing BTB test-and-cull programs. en_ZA
dc.description.department Mammal Research Institute en_ZA
dc.description.department Zoology and Entomology en_ZA
dc.description.librarian am2019 en_ZA
dc.description.sponsorship The US NSF Division of Environmental Biology (Grant number 0090323 awarded to Dr Wayne M. Getz) and the M3B2 DST/NRF SARChI Chair, University of Pretoria. en_ZA
dc.description.uri http://www.plosone.org en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation van Hooft P, Getz WM, Greyling BJ, Bastos ADS (2019) A natural gene drive system influences bovine tuberculosis susceptibility in African buffalo: Possible implications for disease management. PLoS ONE 14(9): e0221168. https://DOI.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0221168. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1932-6203 (online)
dc.identifier.other 10.1371/journal.pone.0221168
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/72443
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en_ZA
dc.rights © 2019 van Hooft et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. en_ZA
dc.subject Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) en_ZA
dc.subject Kruger National Park (KNP) en_ZA
dc.subject Kruger National Park (South Africa) en_ZA
dc.subject HluhluweiMfolozi Park (HiP) en_ZA
dc.subject African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) en_ZA
dc.subject Ecology en_ZA
dc.subject Epigenetics en_ZA
dc.subject Population en_ZA
dc.subject DNA methylation en_ZA
dc.title A natural gene drive system influences bovine tuberculosis susceptibility in African buffalo : possible implications for disease management en_ZA
dc.type Article en_ZA


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