Epidemiology of human astroviruses among children younger than 5 years : prospective hospital‐based sentinel surveillance in South Africa, 2009‐2014

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dc.contributor.author Nadan, Sandrama
dc.contributor.author Taylor, Maureen B.
dc.contributor.author Groome, Michelle J.
dc.contributor.author Cohen, Cheryl
dc.contributor.author Madhi, Shabir A.
dc.contributor.author Page, N.A. (Nicola)
dc.date.accessioned 2018-11-12T06:53:04Z
dc.date.issued 2019-02
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND : The epidemiology of human astroviruses (HAstVs) in hospitalised patients less than 5 years of age from selected sites in South Africa was investigated. Diarrheagenic stool specimens collected from April 2009 to May 2014 were screened retrospectively for selected viruses, bacteria and parasites. METHOD : Patient data were analysed to identify epidemiologic factors most frequently detected with HAstV infections. The following case‐comparisons were investigated; HAstV‐positive and HAstV‐negative children, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)‐infected and HIV‐uninfected (HAstV‐positive) children and HIV‐exposed and unexposed (HAstV‐positive HIV‐uninfected) children. RESULTS : Astrovirus was identified in 7.0% (234/3340) of cases and most frequently in ages 7 to 12 months (9.2%; 90/975) compared with 5.8% to 6.6% in other 6‐month age groups. No seasonal trends were observed. More HAstVs were detected in children from homes that used outdoor water sources (7.6%) compared to indoor sources [5.7%; adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1‐2.1; P = 0.009]. Astroviruses were detected in 8.4% (67/799) of HIV‐uninfected patients that were exposed to HIV compared with 5.9% (74/1257) of HIV‐unexposed patients ( P = 0.032). CONCLUSION : Astroviruses were most prevalent in children aged 7 to 12 months and were detected throughout the study period. The study was limited as only hospitalised patients were investigated and no comparisons were made to diarrhoea‐free control groups. Future HAstV surveillance should include community‐based studies and children presenting at outpatient facilities. en_ZA
dc.description.department Medical Virology en_ZA
dc.description.embargo 2020-02-01
dc.description.librarian hj2018 en_ZA
dc.description.sponsorship The Rotavirus Sentinel Surveillance Program was funded by GlaxoSmithKline (E‐Track 200238). Research was supported by a National Health Laboratory Service Research (004_94494) (SN) and the Poliomyelitis Research Foundation (15/22) (NAP). en_ZA
dc.description.uri http://wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/jmv en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Nadan S, Taylor MB, Groome MJ, Cohen C, Madhi SA, Page NA. Epidemiology of human astroviruses among children younger than 5 years: Prospective hospital‐based sentinel surveillance in South Africa, 2009‐2014. Journal of Medical Virology 2019;91:225‐234. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25308. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 0146-6615 (print)
dc.identifier.issn 1096-9071 (online)
dc.identifier.other 10.1002/jmv.25308
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/67174
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Wiley en_ZA
dc.rights © 2018 Wiley Periodicals Inc. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article : Epidemiology of human astroviruses among children younger than 5 years: Prospective hospital‐based sentinel surveillance in South Africa, 2009‐2014. Journal of Medical Virology 2019;91:225‐234. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25308. The definite version is available at : http://wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/jmv. en_ZA
dc.subject Childhood diarrhoea en_ZA
dc.subject Epidemiology en_ZA
dc.subject Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) en_ZA
dc.subject South Africa (SA) en_ZA
dc.subject Human astroviruses (HAstVs) en_ZA
dc.title Epidemiology of human astroviruses among children younger than 5 years : prospective hospital‐based sentinel surveillance in South Africa, 2009‐2014 en_ZA
dc.type Postprint Article en_ZA


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