Poo’s potential – can we link different land use practices to stress-related hormone levels in leopards (Panthera pardus)?

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Webster, A.B.
dc.contributor.author Burroughs, R.E.J. (Richard)
dc.contributor.author Laver, Pete N.
dc.contributor.author Ganswindt, Andre
dc.contributor.other University of Pretoria. Faculty of Veterinary Science
dc.date.accessioned 2017-07-14T07:51:13Z
dc.date.available 2017-07-14T07:51:13Z
dc.date.created 2016-07-28
dc.date.issued 2016-08-25
dc.description Poster presented at the University of Pretoria, Faculty of Veterinary Science Faculty Day, August 25, 2016, Pretoria, South Africa. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract The leopard’s versatility as a generalist predator facilitates occupation of a wide range of habitats. Although protected areas are important for the conservation of this species, the majority of suitable leopard habitat lies beyond protected area boundaries. Leopards utilizing areas under different anthropogenic influences may therefore be exposed to different environmental, physiological, and psychosocial stressors. This study aims to examine the suitability of enzymeimmunoassays for monitoring adrenocortical function in the leopard based on faecal glucocorticoid metabolite (fGCM) analysis by performing an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge test. Subsequently the study will investigate variations in fGCM concentrations of animals under different anthropogenic influences to identify the potential extrinsic and intrinsic stressors linked to different land use types. The ACTH challenge will be performed on one adult male and one adult female housed at Predator World in the Northwest Province. In addition, gastrointestinal transit time will be determined in 10 animals housed at different captive facilities in the North West, Mpumalanga, and Gauteng Provinces. A potential aging effect of the hormone matrix will be investigated by determining the rate of metabolism of fGCMs post-defaecation. Finally, faecal samples from free-ranging leopards in protected and unprotected areas of Mpumalanga and Limpopo provinces including the Sabi Sands Game Reserve, Guernsey, the Hoedspruit Wildlife Estate and surrounds, will be collected over a period of 6 months. The ability to reliably assess adrenocortical function in leopards will provide a solid foundation from which to further examine endocrine responses to recognised stressors in this iconic African species. Specifically, our study will help to untangle some of the wildlife management, conservation, and human-predator conflict mitigation challenges faced by free-raging leopards at the human-domestic-wildlife interface. en_ZA
dc.description.librarian ab2017 en_ZA
dc.format.extent 1 poster: color photos, graphs en_ZA
dc.format.medium PDF file en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/61351
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Pretoria : University of Pretoria, Faculty of Veterinary Science en_ZA
dc.relation.ispartofseries Veterinary Science Faculty Day posters 2016 en_ZA
dc.relation.requires Abode Acrobat reader en_ZA
dc.rights ©2017 University of Pretoria. Faculty of Veterinary Science (Original and digital).Provided for educational purposes only. It may not be downloaded, reproduced, or distributed in any format without written permission of the original copyright holder. Any attempt to circumvent the access controls placed on this file is a violation of copyright laws and is subject to criminal prosecution. Please contact the collection administrator for copyright issues. en_ZA
dc.subject Panthera pardus en_ZA
dc.subject Hormone levels en_ZA
dc.subject Stress en_ZA
dc.subject.lcsh Veterinary medicine -- Posters en_ZA
dc.subject.lcsh Feces en_ZA
dc.subject.lcsh Leopard en_ZA
dc.subject.lcsh Hormones en_ZA
dc.subject.lcsh Glucocorticoids en_ZA
dc.title Poo’s potential – can we link different land use practices to stress-related hormone levels in leopards (Panthera pardus)? en_ZA
dc.type Presentation en_ZA
dc.type Text en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record