Phronimon Volume 3 Number 1 (2001)

Phronimon Volume 3 Number 1 (2001)

Recent Submissions

  • South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities; Evangeliou, Christos (South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities, 2001)
    There is a tragic element in the respective fates of these two men of genius, Socrates (446-399BC) and Nietzsche (1844-1900), that connects them and keeps them in the memories of sympathetic students of philosophy, in spite ...
  • South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities; Du Plessis, Louis (South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities, 2001)
    The writings of the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche speak in countless voices about innumerable questions of life. In this paper a very tentative perspective is provided on a few phenomena related to human wisdom. After ...
  • South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities; Papatheophilou, A. (South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities, 2001)
    The play "Dionysian feast with Nietzsche" is the second part of the trilogy "Nietzsche, the philosopher and his times". The play attempts to give to the audience some of the main ideas of Nietzsche's philosophy, these being ...
  • Van Tongeren, Paul; South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities; Tongeren, Paul van (South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities, 2001)
    Peter Geach is reported to have said that temperance is far from being an interesting subject, but "rather a humdrum common sense matter". I hope to show that his opinion proves that he did not know the early history of ...
  • South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities; Botha, Catherine Frances (South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities, 2001)
    Poststructuralist thinkers tend to emphasise Nietzsche's critical relationship to science, as a result of their scepticism towards scientific discourse in general. Their interpretation of Nietzsche in this regard is ...
  • South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities; Roodt, V. (South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities, 2001)
    No abstract available.
  • South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities; Berges, S. (South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities, 2001)
    In this paper I aim to refute the claim that Plato and Nietzsche are at opposite poles regarding the treatment of the non-rational elements of the soul, and argue that, instead, they share a complex and psychologically ...
  • South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities; Reedy, J. (South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities, 2001)
    Classicists, philosophers, literary critics and various other scholars have long been interested in the origin and nature of tragedy. Among English speaking scholars A.W. Pickard-Cambridge, Sir William Ridgeway, Gilbert ...
  • South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities; Rauche, G.A. (South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities, 2001)
    In discussing the relevance of Nietzsche's thought to human existence, we shall not concentrate so much on Nietzsche's wellknown influence on theory, on the theories of thinkers such as Freud, Jung, Heidegger and those ...
  • South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities; Maniatis, Y.N. (South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities, 2001)
    In this essay I would like to investigate the phenomenon of the paradox that one finds when is dealing with the thought of Nietzsche on morality. Such a penetrating research into the realm of morality presupposes a tolerant ...
  • South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities; Gericke, J.D. (John Daniel) (South African Society for Greek Philosophy and the Humanities, 2001)
    The general purpose of this paper is to discuss various ways in which the contemporary philosophical issues of nihilism and relativism are related to pre-Socratic and Socratic and Platonic thought. Although Heidegger ...