Restoration potential of invaded abandoned agricultural fields : what does the seed bank tell us?

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dc.contributor.author Haussmann, N.S. (Natalie)
dc.contributor.author Delport, Christopher
dc.contributor.author Kakembo, Vincent
dc.contributor.author Mashiane, K.K. (Katlego)
dc.contributor.author Le Roux, Peter Christiaan
dc.date.accessioned 2019-03-05T09:23:58Z
dc.date.issued 2019-01
dc.description.abstract Soil seed banks can play an important role in the restoration of degraded ecosystems, especially where indigenous species are well represented in, and invasive species are largely absent from, the seed bank. Here, we studied the potential contribution of the soil seed bank to the restoration of invaded, abandoned agricultural fields in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. We recorded the aboveground cover and belowground abundance of all vascular plant species from 120 quadrats that differ in cover of the extralimital woody invader, Pteronia incana. Our results show that higher cover of P. incana is associated with lower species richness, aboveground cover, and belowground seed abundance. Furthermore, community similarity between the above‐ and belowground component was low, with the seed bank and standing vegetation having only 15 species in common and 49 species being recorded only from the seed bank. We suggest that this large number of seed bank‐only species is a relic of previous vegetation, prior to large‐scale invasion by P. incana. The most important finding from our study is the absence of P. incana from the soil seed bank. This finding, combined with the large number of mostly native species from the seed bank, holds promise from a restoration perspective. However, given the susceptibility of the invaded systems to erosion, coupled with the low grazing value of the seed bank species, we suggest that P. incana removal should be accompanied by both erosion control measures and reseeding with palatable grass species, to secure the livelihoods of local communities. en_ZA
dc.description.department Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology en_ZA
dc.description.department Plant Production and Soil Science en_ZA
dc.description.embargo 2020-01-13
dc.description.librarian hj2019 en_ZA
dc.description.sponsorship The National Research Foundation of South Africa (unique grant number 94103). en_ZA
dc.description.uri https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/1526100x en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Haussmann, N.S., Delport, C., Kakembo, V. et al. 2019, 'Restoration potential of invaded abandoned agricultural fields: what does the seed bank tell us?', Restoration Ecology, NYP. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1061-2971 (print)
dc.identifier.issn 1526-100X (online)
dc.identifier.other 10.1111/rec.12923
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/68562
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Wiley en_ZA
dc.rights © 2019 Society for Ecological Restoration. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article : 'Restoration potential of invaded abandoned agricultural fields: what does the seed bank tell us?', Restoration Ecology, vol. , no. , pp. , 2019, doi : 10.1111/rec.12923. The definite version is available at : https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/1526100x. en_ZA
dc.subject Above- and belowground similarity en_ZA
dc.subject Ecological disturbance en_ZA
dc.subject Environmental degradation en_ZA
dc.subject Pteronia incana en_ZA
dc.subject Rangeland restoration en_ZA
dc.subject Shrub invasion en_ZA
dc.title Restoration potential of invaded abandoned agricultural fields : what does the seed bank tell us? en_ZA
dc.type Postprint Article en_ZA


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