Cages for hospitalized patients and intensive care unit cages

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dc.contributor.other University of Pretoria. Faculty of Veterinary Science. Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Studies
dc.contributor.upauthor Van Schoor, Mirinda
dc.date.accessioned 2010-11-05T07:35:28Z
dc.date.available 2010-11-05T07:35:28Z
dc.date.created 2008
dc.date.issued 2010-11-05T07:35:28Z
dc.description Metadata assigned by Dr. M. van Schoor, Senior Lecturer, Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Studies en
dc.description.abstract PHOTOS 1-4: Hospitalized animals must be housed in cages that are secure and comfortable. There should be no sharp edges so the patient cannot hurt itself. The cage should be large enough so the animal can move and turn around. Many critically ill animals may have problems maintaining normal body temperature and need an external heat source. A heating mat can be placed on the floor of the cage so the animal is comfortably warm. Hospitalized animals can develop hyperthermia from heating pads and this should not be confused with true fever. Stainless steel cages should be used and should ideally be placed against the walls of the ward. The cage door must be able to close securely to prevent escape of the patient. Cages must be kept clean and cleaned and disinfected between patients. PHOTO 5: ICU cages should be comfortable and safe for the patient. There should be clear notices of the treatment and special needs of the patient on each cage. Monitoring of patients in the intensive care unit is critical. The cages may be placed on top of each other in rows and adequate space should be allowed for therapeutic and monitoring equipment. PHOTO 6: Oxygen cages are useful for controlling oxygen concentration, temperature and humidity and allow animals to ventilate without assistance. Inspired oxygen concentration of 30-40% is recommended for animals that need oxygen therapy. If the oxygen concentration is too high it can cause oxygen toxicity. Oxygen cages provide a sealed environment, where the fraction of inspired oxygen, humidity and ambient temperature can be controlled and monitored and carbon dioxide can be removed efficiently. Oxygen cages with a Plexiglas front allow observation of the patient, these oxygen cages also have access ports for entry and exit of intravenous lines and monitoring leads. The advantage of using oxygen cages is that it is a non-invasive way of providing oxygen support to critically ill patients. A disadvantage is that oxygen is lost each time the door of the cage is opened. The amount of oxygen lost each time the door is opened and the amount of oxygen needed to fill the cage makes the use of oxygen cages relatively wasteful and expensive. en
dc.description.abstract REFERENCES: PHOTOS 1-6: 1. Manning, AM 2002, ‘Oxygen therapy and toxicity’, Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice, vol. 32, no. 5, pp. 1005-1020. [http://www.mdconsult.com]. 2. McCurnin, DM & Bassert, JM 2006, ‘Clinical textbook for veterinary technicians’, 6th ed., Elsevier Saunders, St. Louis, pp.797. 3. Nelson, RW & Couto, CG, (eds) 2009, ‘Small animal internal medicine’ 4th ed., Mosby Elsevier, St. Louis, pp. 1153-1154. 4. Sattler, FP, Knowles, RP & Whittick, WG (eds) 1981, ‘Veterinary critical care’, Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia, pp.10-12. 5. Silverstein, DC & Hopper, K (eds) 2009, ‘Small animal critical care medicine’, Saunders Elsevier, St. Louis, pp. 4. en
dc.format.extent 6 colour photos en
dc.format.medium JPEG en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/15215
dc.relation.ispartofseries Veterinary critical care slide collection (Dr M. van Schoor) en
dc.rights © Dr Mirinda van Schoor, University of Pretoria. Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Studies (Original and digital). Provided for educational purposes only. It may not be downloaded, reproduced or distributed in any format without written permission of the original copyright holder. Any attempt to circumvent the access controls placed on this file is a violation of copyright laws and is subject to criminal prosecution. Please contact the collection administrator for copyright issues. en
dc.subject Veterinary intensive care en
dc.subject Comfort en
dc.subject Heating pad en
dc.subject Hospitalization en
dc.subject Intensive care unit en
dc.subject Oxygen cage en
dc.subject Warmth en
dc.subject.lcsh Veterinary critical care en
dc.subject.lcsh Veterinary medicine -- South Africa en
dc.subject.lcsh Veterinary emergencies en
dc.title Cages for hospitalized patients and intensive care unit cages en
dc.type Still Image en


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