Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute

Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute

 

This collection is still in an experimental phase

The ARC-Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (ARC-OVI), has a long tradition of veterinary research since its founding in 1908 by Sir Arnold Theiler. It is nationally and internationally recognized as a veterinary centre of excellence. The ARC-OVI is a flagship institution of the Agricultural Research Council and plays an important role in maintaining the health of our national herd and wildlife. This collection (in an experimental phase) consists of the following sections:

General veterinary history collection

African animal trypanosomiasis (Nagana) collection

Heartwater collection

News

For inquiries regarding this collection or items in the collection, please contact Amelia Breytenbach Tel.: +27 12 529 8391

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Recent Submissions

  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2009-05-26)
    Epi- and endocardial haemorrhages are commonly present in the disease.
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2009-03-02)
    Several methods have been or are used to control trypanosomosis. One of the methods is bush clearing to reduce the fly's habitats and breeding sites.
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2009-03-02)
    "Bait" cattle can be used to deterimine the incidence of tsetse flies in an area. Flies landing on cattle to feed are captured.
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2009-03-02)
    Female tsetse flies deposit larvae in soft ground in shady places. The larvae moult to form pupae from which adult flies eventually emerge. The flies (male and female) then seek a blood meal. The mean life span of a male ...
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2009-03-02)
    In Africa, protozoon parasites of the genus Trypanosoma are responsible for causing what is probably still the most important disease of domestic livestock in Africa south of the Sahara Desert i.e. African animal trypanosomosis ...
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-11-14)
    Small animals such as rabbits, ferrets, rats and mice were bred for experimental work in the 1940's. In modern times they are very seldom used as other methods have been developed.
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-11-14)
    Ferrets were bred particularly when experimental work was being done in the 1950's for the development of a canine distemper vaccine as they are also susceptable to the virus (a member of the family Paramyxoviridae)
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-11-14)
    Allerton laboratory was and still is, a regional diagnostic laboratory. It is situated in the Pietermaritzburg district, Kwazulu-Natal.
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-10-03)
    The Pathology building was erected in 1923. On the left is part of the "clinical block" (also called the "animal hospital")
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-08-07)
    Clinical signs of heartwater in cattle is a fever of 40°C or higher which persits for 3-4 days before it falls to below normal shortly before death. Animals cease eating and a diarrhoea may or may not be present. Some ...
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-05-16)
    Considerable expansion of the infrastructure at Onderstepoort, mainly to accommodate new students, took place in the early 1920s. The Biochemistry wing of the main building, the Pathology building, the hospital block and ...
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-05-16)
    The "clinical block" (or animal hospital) housed primarily large and small animals that were patients of the surgery department. Notice the lungering ring (circular "path") in the centre of the lawn.
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-05-16)
    On the photo in the right foreground are the animal stables, in centre distance, is the "clinical block" (animal hospital) and on the right, part of the Pathology building.
  • Robinson, J.; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-04-17)
    Glossina morsitans, a species originally thought to be the sole transmitter of Trypanosoma brucei brucei, the cause of nagana in central Africa; this species transmits this disease in some regions, but it is not the sole ...
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-04-16)
    Tsetse-flies are bloodsucking flies which transmit trypanosomes biologically from animal to animal.
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-03-28)
    Several methods have been or are used to control trypanosomosis. Some of these are: 1. Control of the vectors (i.e. tsetse flies [Glossina spp]) -- 1.1. Remove their source of food (i.e. blood of animals) by reducing the ...
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-03-27)
    There are no clinical signs specific for trypanosomosis. The disease may be acute, sub-acute or chronic. Acute disease may be fatal after an illness lasting 2-6 weeks, or it may developed into the chronic phrase which may ...
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-03-13)
    There are no clinical signs specific for trypanosomosis. The disease may be acute, sub-acute or chronic. Acute disease may be fatal after an illness lasting 2-6 weeks, or it may developed into the chronic phrase which may ...
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-03-13)
    Chronic trypanosomosis caused by Trypanosoma virax. The chronic form - the most common - is characterized by emaciation, weakness, lethargy, anaemia, enlarged lymph nodes and subcutaneous (dependent) oedema.
  • Unknown; Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (South Africa) (2008-03-03)
    The ARC-OVI owes its origin to the rinderpest outbreak that swept through South Africa in 1896. Its forerunner was a laboratory established at Daspoort by Arnold Theiler in 1897.

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