The Relationship Between the Illegal Trade in Wildlife and Human Security

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dc.contributor.advisor Henwood, Roland
dc.contributor.postgraduate Howell, Megan
dc.date.accessioned 2022-01-31T09:05:15Z
dc.date.available 2022-01-31T09:05:15Z
dc.date.created 2022-04
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.description Mini dissertation (MA (Security Studies))--University of Pretoria, 2021. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Abstract Over the past few decades, the illegal trade in wildlife has significantly increased, making it one of the most profitable transnational organised crimes globally. Whilst this illicit activity has gained traction within the international security agenda, mainstream crimes such as terrorism and weapon/drug trafficking continuously overshadow this threat in terms of security prioritisations within the national security agenda of states. The objective of this study is to examine how the illegal trade in wildlife poses a direct threat to human security in order to emphasise the importance of prioritizing this illicit activity as a fundamental challenge to the security of the state and its individuals. Using a systematic research approach to conduct this study, the paper commences by introducing the key theoretical concepts used throughout the paper, followed by analysing the three central driving forces behind the illegal trade in wildlife. By examining these drivers, the study is able to demonstrate the influences behind the expansion of this illicit activity, highlight the interlinkages between the various domains and underline the consequential effects of the illegal wildlife trade on national, human, and environmental security. South Africa is subsequently used as a case study, to explain how a country’s economic, political, and environmental setting largely determines the presence of illegal wildlife syndicates. The last section of the paper summarises the central findings of the research, followed by providing a number of recommendations that can be used to address/prevent the challenges influencing this activity. The paper concludes by discussing how the objective of the study was achieved and suggests a way forward in terms of enhancing regional and global collaborations in order to combat the illegal trade in wildlife. en_ZA
dc.description.availability Unrestricted en_ZA
dc.description.degree MA (Security Studies) en_ZA
dc.description.department Political Sciences en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation * en_ZA
dc.identifier.other A2022 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/83529
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher University of Pretoria
dc.rights © 2022 University of Pretoria. All rights reserved. The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria.
dc.subject UCTD en_ZA
dc.subject Political Sciences en_ZA
dc.subject illegal wildlife trade
dc.subject Human security
dc.subject Governance
dc.subject Securitisation
dc.title The Relationship Between the Illegal Trade in Wildlife and Human Security en_ZA
dc.type Mini Dissertation en_ZA


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