Conserving Africa’s wildlife and wildlands through the COVID-19 crisis and beyond

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Lindsey, Peter Andrew
dc.contributor.author Allan, James
dc.contributor.author Brehony, Peadar
dc.contributor.author Dickman, Amy
dc.contributor.author Robson, Ashley
dc.contributor.author Begg, Colleen
dc.contributor.author Bhammar, Hasita
dc.contributor.author Blanken, Lisa
dc.contributor.author Breuer, Thomas
dc.contributor.author Fitzgerald, Kathleen
dc.contributor.author Flyman, Michael
dc.contributor.author Gandiwa, Patience
dc.contributor.author Giva, Nicia
dc.contributor.author Kaelo, Dickson
dc.contributor.author Nampindo, Simon
dc.contributor.author Nyambe, Nyambe
dc.contributor.author Steiner, Kurt
dc.contributor.author Parker, Andrew N.
dc.contributor.author Roe, Dilys
dc.contributor.author Thomson, Paul
dc.contributor.author Trimble, Morgan
dc.contributor.author Caron, Alexandre
dc.contributor.author Tyrrell, Peter
dc.date.accessioned 2021-05-18T11:10:47Z
dc.date.available 2021-05-18T11:10:47Z
dc.date.issued 2020-10
dc.description.abstract The SARS-CoV-2 virus and COVID-19 illness are driving a global crisis. Governments have responded by restricting human movement, which has reduced economic activity. These changes may benefit biodiversity conservation in some ways, but in Africa, we contend that the net conservation impacts of COVID-19 will be strongly negative. Here, we describe how the crisis creates a perfect storm of reduced funding, restrictions on the operations of conservation agencies, and elevated human threats to nature. We identify the immediate steps necessary to address these challenges and support ongoing conservation efforts. We then highlight systemic flaws in contemporary conservation and identify opportunities to restructure for greater resilience. Finally, we emphasize the critical importance of conserving habitat and regulating unsafe wildlife trade practices to reduce the risk of future pandemics. en_ZA
dc.description.department Mammal Research Institute en_ZA
dc.description.librarian am2021 en_ZA
dc.description.sponsorship The EU and a fellowship from the Recanati-Kaplan Foundation. en_ZA
dc.description.uri http://www.nature.com/natecolevol en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Lindsey, P., Allan, J., Brehony, P. et al. Conserving Africa’s wildlife and wildlands through the COVID-19 crisis and beyond. Nature Ecology and Evolution 4, 1300–1310 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-020-1275-6. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 2397-334X
dc.identifier.other 10.1038/s41559-020-1275-6
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/79949
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Nature Research en_ZA
dc.rights © Springer Nature Limited 2020. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. en_ZA
dc.subject Global crisis en_ZA
dc.subject Africa en_ZA
dc.subject COVID-19 pandemic en_ZA
dc.subject Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) en_ZA
dc.subject Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) en_ZA
dc.subject Conservation biology en_ZA
dc.subject Environmental studies en_ZA
dc.title Conserving Africa’s wildlife and wildlands through the COVID-19 crisis and beyond en_ZA
dc.type Article en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record