Socio-economic, infrastructural and health-related risk factors associated with adverse heat-health effects reportedly experienced during hot weather in South Africa

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dc.contributor.author Wright, C.Y. (Caradee)
dc.contributor.author Dominick, Friederike
dc.contributor.author Kapwata, Thandi
dc.contributor.author Bidassey-Manilal, Shalin
dc.contributor.author Engelbrecht, Jacobus Christoffel
dc.contributor.author Stich, Heribert
dc.contributor.author Mathee, Angela
dc.contributor.author Matooane, Mamopeli
dc.date.accessioned 2020-03-09T05:43:53Z
dc.date.available 2020-03-09T05:43:53Z
dc.date.issued 2019-09-18
dc.description.abstract INTRODUCTION : poor urban communities are likely to bear the brunt of climate change impacts on health and well-being. The City of Johannesburg, South Africa, is predicted to experience an average increase in ambient temperature of 4°C by 2100. Focusing on the urban environment, this study aimed to determine socio-economic, infrastructural and health-related risk factors for heat-related adverse health effects. METHODS : this was a crosssectional study. Data of interest were collected using a pretested and validated questionnaire administered to parents of children attending schools participating in a school heat study. Information related to demographic, socio-economic and household-level determinants of health, which has an impact on the individual prevalence of adverse heat-health effects associated with hot weather, was collected for 136 households and 580 individuals. RESULTS : sweating (n = 208 individuals; 35%), headache and nausea (n = 111; 19%) and weakness, fatigue and dizziness (n = 87; 15%) were the most common heat-health effects reportedly experienced by individuals (n = 580) during hot weather. Individuals who suffered from hypertension (OR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.34 - 4.05, p = 0.003) and individuals older than 60 years (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.27-1.99, p < 0.001) compared to other age groups were more likely to experience 'any heat-health effects'. Living in government-sponsored detached housing and in houses with asbestos roofs were associated with an increase in reported experience of 'any heat-health effects' compared to living in other housing types. CONCLUSION : heathealth awareness campaigns should target people suffering from pre-existing diseases and the elderly, as these groups are especially vulnerable to heat. Focus should also be given to appropriate roofing and insulation in government-sponsored housing since summertime temperatures are projected to increase. en_ZA
dc.description.department Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology en_ZA
dc.description.librarian am2020 en_ZA
dc.description.sponsorship A Thuthuka Grant (Grant Number 80677) to M Matooane from the National Research Foundation in South Africa and co-funded by a parliamentary grant from the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. CY Wright receives research funding support from the South African Medical Research Council and the National Research Foundation. en_ZA
dc.description.uri http://www.panafrican-med-journal.com en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Wright, C.Y., Dominick, F., Kapwata, T. et al. 2019, 'Socio-economic, infrastructural and health-related risk factors associated with adverse heat-health effects reportedly experienced during hot weather in South Africa', Pan African Medical Journal, vol. 34, art. 40, pp. 1-10. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1937-8688 (online)
dc.identifier.other 10.11604/pamj.2019.34.40.17569
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/73669
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher African Field Epidemiology Network en_ZA
dc.rights © Caradee Yael Wright et al. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0). en_ZA
dc.subject Climate change en_ZA
dc.subject Environmental health en_ZA
dc.subject Temperature exposure en_ZA
dc.subject South Africa (SA) en_ZA
dc.subject Socio-economic risk factors en_ZA
dc.subject Infrastructural risk factors en_ZA
dc.subject Health-related risk factors en_ZA
dc.subject Heat-health effects en_ZA
dc.title Socio-economic, infrastructural and health-related risk factors associated with adverse heat-health effects reportedly experienced during hot weather in South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Article en_ZA


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