Environmentally friendly methods for controlling pine pitch canker

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Martin-Garcia, J.
dc.contributor.author Zas, R.
dc.contributor.author Solla, A.
dc.contributor.author Woodward, S.
dc.contributor.author Hantula, Jarkko
dc.contributor.author Vainio, E.J.
dc.contributor.author Mullett, M.
dc.contributor.author Morales-Rodriguez, C.
dc.contributor.author Vannini, A.
dc.contributor.author Martinez-Alvarez, P.
dc.contributor.author Pinto, G.
dc.contributor.author Alves, A.
dc.contributor.author Amaral, J.
dc.contributor.author Wingfield, Michael J.
dc.contributor.author Fourie, Gerda
dc.contributor.author Steenkamp, Emma Theodora
dc.contributor.author Ahumada, R.
dc.contributor.author Sera, B.
dc.contributor.author Sanz-Ros, A.V.
dc.contributor.author Raposo, R.
dc.contributor.author Elvira-Recuenco, M.
dc.contributor.author Iturritxa, E.
dc.contributor.author Gordon, T.R.
dc.contributor.author Diez, J.J.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-06-20T11:03:42Z
dc.date.issued 2019-06
dc.description.abstract Fusarium circinatum is a highly virulent invasive pathogen that causes the disease commonly known as pine pitch canker (PPC). On mature trees, the most common symptoms of PPC include resin bleeding, resinous cankers, wilting of needles and dieback. In nurseries the main symptoms are yellowish needles, and wilting of foliage and shoots. PPC is considered one of the most important diseases of conifers globally and at least 60 species of Pinus along with Pseudotsuga menziesii are known to be susceptible. Quarantine regulations are crucial to minimize the risk of new introductions into disease‐free countries. However, if these measures fail, implementation of environmentally friendly control methods is currently encouraged in an integrated management approach that minimizes the use of chemicals in forests. This review therefore summarizes current knowledge of biological control using endophytic fungi, bacteria and viruses, and other environmentally friendly methods to control PPC, including thermotherapy, natural products with fungicidal effects, promoters of innate host resistance mechanisms and breeding for resistance. Key research gaps to be addressed for improvement of effective management of this disease are discussed. en_ZA
dc.description.department Biochemistry en_ZA
dc.description.department Forestry and Agricultural Biotechnology Institute (FABI) en_ZA
dc.description.department Genetics en_ZA
dc.description.department Microbiology and Plant Pathology en_ZA
dc.description.embargo 2020-06-01
dc.description.librarian hj2019 en_ZA
dc.description.sponsorship This article is based upon work carried out during COST Action FP1406 PINESTRENGTH (Pine pitch canker‐strategies for management of Gibberella circinata in greenhouses and forests), supported by COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology). This work is a contribution of URGENTpine (PTDC/AGR‐FOR/2768/2014) funded by FCT – Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, I.P., through national funds, and the co‐funding by the FEDER (POCI‐01‐0145‐FEDER‐016785), within the PT2020 Partnership Agreement and Compete 2020. Thanks are due for the financial support to CESAM (UID/AMB/50017/2019), to FCT/MEC through national funds, and the co‐funding by the FEDER, within the PT2020 Partnership Agreement and Compete 2020. FCT supported J. M.‐G. (SFRH/BPD/122928/2016), J. A. (SFRH/BD/120967/2016), G. P. (SFRH/BPD/101669/2014) and A. A. (IF/00835/2013). Funds from the Spanish Government via the MINECO/FEDER grant NGSFORFUSARIUM (AGL2015‐69370‐R) and FUTURPIN (AGL2015‐68274‐C03‐02‐R) are also acknowledged. E. J. V. received funding from the Academy of Finland (grant decision number 309896). The contribution of M. M. was funded by the Forestry Commission, UK. The authors declare no conflict of interest. S. W. was partly financed by the project PROTREE, which was funded jointly by a grant from BBSRC, Defra, ESRC, the Forestry Commission, NERC and the Scottish Government, under the Tree Health and Plant Biosecurity Initiative. en_ZA
dc.description.uri https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/13653059 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Martin-Garcia, J., Zas, R., Solla, A. et al. 2019, 'Environmentally friendly methods for controlling pine pitch canker', Plant Pathology, vol. 68, no. 5, pp. 843-860. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 0032-0862 (print)
dc.identifier.issn 1365-3059 (online)
dc.identifier.other 10.1111/ppa.13009
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/70256
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Wiley en_ZA
dc.rights © 2019 British Society for Plant Pathology. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article : 'Environmentally friendly methods for controlling pine pitch canker', Plant Pathology, vol. 68, no. 5, pp. 843-860, 2019, doi : 10.1111/ppa.13009. The definite version is available at : https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/13653059. en_ZA
dc.subject Endophytes en_ZA
dc.subject Fusarium circinatum en_ZA
dc.subject Genetic resistance en_ZA
dc.subject Natural compounds en_ZA
dc.subject Thermotherapy en_ZA
dc.subject Viruses en_ZA
dc.subject Pine pitch canker (PPC) en_ZA
dc.title Environmentally friendly methods for controlling pine pitch canker en_ZA
dc.type Postprint Article en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record