Pup provisioning in the cooperatively breeding African wild dog, Lycaon pictus, is driven by pack size, social status and age

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dc.contributor.author Forssman, K.R. (Katherine)
dc.contributor.author Marneweck, Courtney
dc.contributor.author O’Riain, M. Justin
dc.contributor.author Davies-Mostert, Harriet T.
dc.contributor.author Mills, Michael G.L.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-04-17T09:41:20Z
dc.date.available 2019-04-17T09:41:20Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.description.abstract Division of labour, in terms of providing for offspring, in obligate cooperatively breeding mammalian species is poorly understood.To understand offspring provisioning in a cooperatively breeding canid, we analysed a long-term dataset comprising 22 African wild dog, Lycaon pictus,denning events (nine packs over nine consecutive years).We investigated the effects of sex, age class, social status, and pack size on the likelihood and frequency of regurgitating food to pups at the den. We found that the interaction of social status and pack size affected the likelihood of regurgitation. Specifically, when in a large (>15) pack, dominant individuals were less likely to regurgitate than subordinate individuals. However, in smaller (£15) packs, dominant individuals were more likely to regurgitate than subordinate individuals.We also found that the interaction of age and pack size affected the frequency of regurgitation. Specifically, in large packs, yearlings regurgitated more frequently per observation period than adults. Contrastingly, in smaller packs, adults regurgitated more frequently.Sex did not affect pup provisioning.We suggest that these contrasting patterns of helping are best explained by a strong selection pressure for individual behaviour that results in larger pack sizes in this species. When in larger packs, costs are shared as the division of labour spreads amongst individuals. In smaller packs, a division of labour requires individuals that already experience costs (such as reproduction) to be further burdened by provisioning. Overall, our results support that the need for more helpers to care for offspring contributes to the evolutionary consequence of an inverse density dependence. en_ZA
dc.description.department Veterinary Tropical Diseases en_ZA
dc.description.librarian am2019 en_ZA
dc.description.uri http://www.sawma.co.za en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Forssman, K.R., Marneweck, C., O’Riain, M.J. et al' 2018, 'Pup provisioning in the cooperatively breeding African wild dog, Lycaon pictus, is driven by pack size, social status and age', African Journal of Wildlife Research, vol. 48, no. 1, pp. 013005: 1-10. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 2410-7220 (print)
dc.identifier.issn 2410-8200 (online)
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/68999
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Southern African Wildlife Management Association en_ZA
dc.rights Southern African Wildlife Management Association en_ZA
dc.subject Division of labour en_ZA
dc.subject Helping behaviour en_ZA
dc.subject Kin selection en_ZA
dc.subject Pack size en_ZA
dc.subject Regurgitation en_ZA
dc.subject African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) en_ZA
dc.subject Social status en_ZA
dc.subject Age en_ZA
dc.title Pup provisioning in the cooperatively breeding African wild dog, Lycaon pictus, is driven by pack size, social status and age en_ZA
dc.type Article en_ZA


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