Helminth composition and prevalence of indigenous and invasive synanthropic murid rodents in urban areas of Gauteng Province, South Africa

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dc.contributor.author Julius, R.S. (Rolanda)
dc.contributor.author Schwan, Ernst Volker
dc.contributor.author Chimimba, Christian Timothy
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-22T06:59:56Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-22T06:59:56Z
dc.date.issued 2018-07
dc.description.abstract Although synanthropic rodents such as the indigenous species, Mastomys coucha, and the invasive species, Rattus norvegicus, R. rattus and R. tanezumi, are well-known to be hosts to various micro- and macroparasites, their helminth parasite fauna is poorly studied in South Africa. In an attempt to remedy the situation, the aim of the present study was to investigate the helminth fauna of these sympatric rodent species, which were obtained from the informal settlements of Alexandra, Tembisa, Diepsloot and residential suburbs of Pretoria and Hammanskraal, Gauteng Province, South Africa. Helminths were recovered from the urinary bladder, liver and gastrointestinal tract and were identified morphologically and molecularly. The recovered nematodes were all rodent-specific and included Aspiculuris tetraptera, Eucoleus sp., Heterakis spumosa, Mastophorus muris, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Protospirura sp., Strongyloides ratti, Syphacia obvelata, Syphacia muris, Trichuris sp. and Trichosomoides crassicauda. Syphacia obvelata, a commensal nematode of laboratory rodents, was recovered from indigenous M. coucha. Strobilar stages of cestodes recovered included Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana and Inermicapsifer madagascariensis. Recovered metacestodes were strobilocerci of Hydatigera taeniaeformis from all three invasive Rattus species and coenurostrobilocerci of Hydatigera parva from M. coucha. An acanthocephalan, Moniliformis moniliformis, was recovered from R. rattus only. All rodent species examined showed high helminth infection prevalence (≥70%) with equal or higher nematode than cestode prevalence. Mastomys coucha, however, showed significantly lower cestode prevalence than Rattus species where they co-occur. Interspecific transmission of helminths likely occurs between invasive and indigenous rodents, and these rodents harbour several helminths that have zoonotic implications. en_ZA
dc.description.department Veterinary Tropical Diseases en_ZA
dc.description.department Zoology and Entomology en_ZA
dc.description.librarian hj2019 en_ZA
dc.description.sponsorship The National Research Foundation (NRF) DNA sequencing facility of the University of Pretoria (NRF RISP grant 2001/2012; UID: 78566) and the DST-NRF Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology (CIB). en_ZA
dc.description.uri http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JHL en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Julius, R.S., Schwan, E.V. & Chimimba, C.T. 2018, 'Helminth composition and prevalence of indigenous and invasive synanthropic murid rodents in urban areas of Gauteng Province, South Africa', Journal of Helminthology, vol. 92, no. 4, pp. 445-454. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 0022-149X (print)
dc.identifier.issn 1475-2697 (online)
dc.identifier.issn 10.1017/S0022149X17000761
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/68508
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Cambridge University Press en_ZA
dc.rights © Cambridge University Press 2017 en_ZA
dc.subject Rodentia en_ZA
dc.subject Mastomys en_ZA
dc.subject Rattus en_ZA
dc.subject Helminths en_ZA
dc.subject Diversity en_ZA
dc.subject Commensal en_ZA
dc.subject Southern Africa en_ZA
dc.subject Rats en_ZA
dc.subject Cestoda en_ZA
dc.subject Parasite en_ZA
dc.subject Evolution en_ZA
dc.subject Nematoda en_ZA
dc.title Helminth composition and prevalence of indigenous and invasive synanthropic murid rodents in urban areas of Gauteng Province, South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Postprint Article en_ZA


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