Fuelwood extraction intensity drives compensatory regrowth in African savanna communal lands

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dc.contributor.author Mograbi, Penelope J.
dc.contributor.author Witkowski, Ed T.F.
dc.contributor.author Erasmus, Barend F.N.
dc.contributor.author Asner, Gregory P.
dc.contributor.author Fisher, Jolene T.
dc.contributor.author Mathieu, Renaud
dc.contributor.author Wessels, K.J. (Konrad)
dc.date.accessioned 2018-12-10T05:34:07Z
dc.date.issued 2018-10
dc.description.abstract Woody biomass remains the primary energy source for domestic use in the developing world, raising concerns about woodland sustainability. Yet woodland regenerative capacity and the adaptive response of harvesters to localised fuelwood shortages are often underestimated or unaccounted for in fuelwood supply–demand models. Here, we explore the rates and patterns of height‐specific woody vegetation structural dynamics in three communal lands in a semiarid savanna in South Africa. Using repeat, airborne light detection and ranging, we measured height‐specific change in woody vegetation structure, and the relative influence of geology, fire, and ease of access to fuelwood. Monitoring 634,284 trees canopies over 4 years revealed high compensatory growth, particularly in the high wood extraction communal land: 34.1% of trees increased in height >1 m. Vegetation structural patterns were associated with ease of access to the communal land but were mediated by wood extraction intensity. In these communal lands, vegetation structural dynamics show rapid woody thickening as a response to repeat harvesting. However, loss of height in vegetation structure did not follow a gradient of wood extraction intensity. We propose a conceptual framework to better understand change in vegetation structural metrics and the paradoxical phenomenon of high growth in high wood extraction scenarios. We also show coadaptive responses of humans and woody vegetation to fuelwood harvesting in human–environment systems through patterns of regrowth response relative to ease of access to fuelwood resources. en_ZA
dc.description.department Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology en_ZA
dc.description.embargo 2019-10-30
dc.description.librarian hj2018 en_ZA
dc.description.sponsorship LiDAR data collection was funded by the Andrew Mellon Foundation, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) Strategic Research Panel and the Department of Science and Technology (DST). The CAO has been made possible by grants and donations from the Avatar Alliance Foundation, Margaret A. Cargill Foundation, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment, W. M. Keck Foundation, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Andrew Mellon Foundation, Mary Anne Nyburg Baker and G. Leonard Baker Jr, and William R. Hearst III. B. F. N. E. is supported by the Exxaro Chairman's Fund. P. J. M. is funded by the DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Tree Health Biotechnology and an NRF Innovation Scholarship (grant UID: 95030). en_ZA
dc.description.uri http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1099-145X en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Mograbi PJ, Witkowski ETF, Erasmus BFN, et al. Fuelwood extraction intensity drives compensatory regrowth in African savanna communal lands. Land Degradation and Development. 2018;1–12. https://doi.org/10.1002/ldr.3210. NYP. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1085-3278 (print)
dc.identifier.issn 1099-145X (online)
dc.identifier.other 10.1002/ldr.3210
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/68066
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Wiley en_ZA
dc.rights © John Wiley and Sons, Ltd. This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article : Fuelwood extraction intensity drives compensatory regrowth in African savanna communal lands. Land Degradation and Development. 2018;1–12. https://doi.org/10.1002/ldr.3210. The definite version is available at : http://onlinelibrary.wiley.comjournal/10.1002/(ISSN)1099-145X. en_ZA
dc.subject Bushbuckridge en_ZA
dc.subject Coppice en_ZA
dc.subject Fuelwood harvesting en_ZA
dc.subject LiDAR en_ZA
dc.subject Subcanopy structure en_ZA
dc.subject Developing countries en_ZA
dc.subject Extraction en_ZA
dc.subject Harvesting en_ZA
dc.subject Optical radar en_ZA
dc.subject Reforestation en_ZA
dc.subject Structural dynamics en_ZA
dc.subject Sustainable development en_ZA
dc.subject Vegetation en_ZA
dc.subject Light detection and ranging en_ZA
dc.subject Primary energy source en_ZA
dc.subject Regenerative capacity en_ZA
dc.subject Wood products en_ZA
dc.title Fuelwood extraction intensity drives compensatory regrowth in African savanna communal lands en_ZA
dc.type Postprint Article en_ZA


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