The value of participation and legitimacy in the constitution-making processes of post-independence Cameroon and post-apartheid South Africa

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dc.contributor.author Wanki, Justin Ngambu
dc.date.accessioned 2018-08-07T13:13:01Z
dc.date.available 2018-08-07T13:13:01Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.description.abstract In this article I contend that the Constitution-making process in postapartheid South Africa provides a suitable paradigm that could enable post-independence Cameroon to break away from the past neo-colonialist and authoritarian ideologies in its future Constitution-making processes. Cameroon’s Constitution-making deficit can be traced back to the independence Constitution-making process which implicitly facilitated neo-colonialism. Conversely, the Constitution-making process in postapartheid South Africa espoused a break from apartheid, oppression, and authoritarianism. The nature and structures of the resultant Constitutions of the two countries attest to this view. Using the Constitution-making process in post-apartheid South Africa as an appropriate paradigm, I argue for a new trajectory as a response to post-independence Cameroonian Constitutions’ subjection to neo-colonialism and authoritarianism. Inspiration from the South African paradigm of introducing the judiciary into the Constitution-making process is a novelty worthy of emulation by post-independence Cameroon. This paradigm promises greater legitimacy in the Constitution-making process and renders the final Constitution more ‘self-binding’ (binding on Cameroonians). The suitability of the South African paradigm is informed by the imperative to realign post-independence Cameroonian Constitutions with conventional and democratic principles of Constitution-making as exemplified by the post-apartheid South African model. In this way the Constitution-making process in post-independence Cameroon would systematically eradicate the ‘chicanery-approach’ of neo-colonialists and their neo-colonial acolytes, so that the resulting constitution is a manifestation of the will of the people. en_ZA
dc.description.department Jurisprudence en_ZA
dc.description.librarian am2018 en_ZA
dc.description.uri http://content.ajarchive.org/cdm4/index_00104051.php?CISOROOT=/00104051 en_ZA
dc.description.uri http://www.journals.co.za/content/journal/cilsa en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Wanki, J.N. 2017, 'The value of participation and legitimacy in the constitution-making processes of post-independence Cameroon and post-apartheid South Africa', Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa, vol. 50, no. 1, 109-128. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 0010-4051
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/66134
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Institute for Foreign and Comparative Law en_ZA
dc.rights © Juta and Company (Pty) Ltd en_ZA
dc.subject Post-apartheid South Africa en_ZA
dc.subject Post-independence Cameroon en_ZA
dc.subject Participation en_ZA
dc.subject Legitimacy en_ZA
dc.subject Constitution-making process en_ZA
dc.title The value of participation and legitimacy in the constitution-making processes of post-independence Cameroon and post-apartheid South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Article en_ZA


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