Identification of transcription factors potentially involved in human adipogenesis in vitro

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dc.contributor.author Ambele, Melvin Anyasi
dc.contributor.author Pepper, Michael Sean
dc.date.accessioned 2018-03-05T11:43:00Z
dc.date.available 2018-03-05T11:43:00Z
dc.date.issued 2017-05
dc.description Table S1. A complete list of differentially expressed genes on day 1. en_ZA
dc.description Table S2. A complete list of differentially expressed genes on day 7. en_ZA
dc.description Table S3. A complete list of differentially expressed genes on day 14. en_ZA
dc.description Table S4. A complete list of differentially expressed genes on day 21. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND : Increased adiposity in humans leads to obesity, which is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. We previously conducted an extensive unbiased in vitro transcriptomic analysis of adipogenesis, using human adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs). Here, we have applied computational methods to these data to identify transcription factors (TFs) that constitute the upstream gene regulatory networks potentially, driving adipocyte formation in human ASCs. METHODS : We used Affymetrix Transcription Analysis ConsoleTM v3.0 for calculating differentially expressed genes. MATCHTM and F-MATCHTM algorithms for TF identification. STRING v10 to predict protein–protein interactions between TFs. RESULTS : A number of TFs that were reported to have a significant role in adipogenesis, as well as novel TFs that have not previously been described in this context, were identified. Thus, 32 upstream TFs were identified, with most belonging to the C2H2-type zinc finger and HOX families, which are potentially involved in regulating most of the differentially expressed genes observed during adipocyte differentiation. Furthermore, 17 important upstream TFs were found to have increased regulatory effects on their downstream target genes and were consistently up-regulated during the differentiation process. A strong hypothetical functional interaction was observed among these TFs, which supports their common role in the downstream regulation of gene expression during adipogenesis. CONCLUSION : Our results support several previous findings on TFs involved in adipogenesi and thereby validate the comprehensive and systematic in silico approach described in this study. In silico analysis also allowed for the identification of novel regulators of adipocyte differentiation. en_ZA
dc.description.department Immunology en_ZA
dc.description.librarian am2018 en_ZA
dc.description.sponsorship National Health Laboratory Services Research Trust South Africa (Grant/Award Number: ‘grant no. 94453’), South African Medical Research Council (Grant/Award Number: ‘SAMRC’s Flagship Award Project SAMRCRFA- UFSP-01’), National Research Foundation of South Africa (Grant/Award Number: ‘grant no. 86942’). en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Ambele, M.A. & Pepper, M.S. 2017, 'Identification of transcription factors potentially involved in human adipogenesis in vitro', Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 210-222. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 2324-9269
dc.identifier.other 10.1002/mgg3.269
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/64149
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Wiley en_ZA
dc.rights © 2017 University of Pretoria. Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. en_ZA
dc.subject Adipocyte differentiation en_ZA
dc.subject Human adipogenesis en_ZA
dc.subject Human adipose-derived stromal cells en_ZA
dc.subject Obesity en_ZA
dc.subject Adipose‐derived stromal cells (ASCs) en_ZA
dc.subject Transcription factors (TFs) en_ZA
dc.title Identification of transcription factors potentially involved in human adipogenesis in vitro en_ZA
dc.type Article en_ZA


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