Urban space in transformation : reading social change in Vladislavic's Johannesburg Pamuk's Istanbul and Dalrymple's Delhi

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dc.contributor.advisor Sandwith, Corinne en
dc.contributor.postgraduate Weder, Nandi en
dc.date.accessioned 2017-10-11T11:55:56Z
dc.date.available 2017-10-11T11:55:56Z
dc.date.created 2017-09-06 en
dc.date.issued 2017 en
dc.description Dissertation (MA)--University of Pretoria, 2017. en
dc.description.abstract Our cultural values and socio-political perspectives are perhaps most clearly reflected in our material environment. When this environment is subjected to drastic change, the effects on these values and perspectives are likely to be profound. This dissertation considers the wide-ranging socio-cultural effects of material change through a close reading of three literary texts, each of which presents a portrait of a particular city in transition. The three texts which form the basis of this study are Orhan Pamuk's Istanbul: Memories and the City, William Dalrymple's City of Djinns: A Year in Delhi, and Ivan Vladislavic's Portrait with Keys: The City of Johannesburg Unlocked. In my reading of the effects of material change as depicted in these texts, I draw on architectural theorist Fred Scott's three possible approaches to existing material and cultural infrastructure, namely demolition, preservation and re-appropriation. Using this framework, and extending it in several ways, I discuss the ways in which processes of demolition/destruction, preservation, and adaptation/re-appropriation are inscribed in these texts. In Pamuk's Istanbul, the founding of the modern nation state of Turkey is shown to have stimulated two opposing responses, namely Mustafa Kemal's discourse of Turkification, concerned with development and modernity, and a reactionary melancholy yearning for the past, called hüzün. Dalrymple's City of Djinns highlights the various forms of socio-cultural destruction which accompanied Partition while also documenting the many examples of accidental preservation within the rapidly modernising city; also important in City of Djinns are descriptions of material and cultural re-appropriation, highlighted in depictions of urban resilience and the formation of new heterogeneous communities capable of transcending former divisions. Vladislavic's Johannesburg is also concerned with three possible responses to change in the urban environment after the abolition of apartheid: the urge to demolish and emigrate, the contrary need to preserve and fortify, as well as the compromise offered by the decision to re-appropriate and adapt. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Orhan Pamuk af_ZA
dc.description.availability Unrestricted en
dc.description.degree MA en
dc.description.department English en
dc.identifier.citation Weder, N 2017, Urban space in transformation : reading social change in Vladislavic's Johannesburg Pamuk's Istanbul and Dalrymple's Delhi, MA Dissertation, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, viewed yymmdd <http://hdl.handle.net/2263/62670> en
dc.identifier.other S2017 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/62670
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University of Pretoria en
dc.rights © 2017 University of Pretoria. All rights reserved. The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria. en
dc.subject UCTD en
dc.subject Cities in literature en
dc.subject Literary representations of social change en
dc.subject Literary representations of material change en
dc.title Urban space in transformation : reading social change in Vladislavic's Johannesburg Pamuk's Istanbul and Dalrymple's Delhi en_ZA
dc.type Dissertation en


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