Seeing God’s voice in creation : a visio-spatial interpretation of Genesis 1

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dc.contributor.advisor Buitendag, Johan
dc.contributor.coadvisor Rinquest, Lindsay
dc.contributor.postgraduate Rabie-Boshoff, Annelien
dc.date.accessioned 2017-08-02T07:31:25Z
dc.date.available 2017-08-02T07:31:25Z
dc.date.created 2017
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.description Thesis (PhD)--University of Pretoria, 2016. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Contemporary Christians, evangelicals in particular, find it problematic to formulate and understand the relationship between the Christian faith tradition and natural science, with the result that they struggle in their understanding of the creation story in Genesis 1. The purpose of this study was to bring Christian theology and the science of linguistics into dialogue with each other in an attempt to understand the biblical creation story in modern-day terms. The motivation for the study is based on the belief and understanding that within the paradigm of the dialogue model disciplines other than theology, like linguistics, can bring insights to the world of the Bible and vice versa. The hypothesis for this thesis is based on the presupposition that God’s voice, believed to be inaudible sacred sound as Pretorius (2011:1-7) envisions it, can indeed be seen by humans as it becomes visible in creation, and interpreted in a way similar to the way deaf people communicate. This interpretation finds support from insights gained from the world of the Deaf and the basic principles of ‘Sign’, the language used to communicate within the deaf community. Two significant characteristics of Sign that strongly resonate with the picture of the natural world emerging from Genesis 1, are its unique and complex use of threedimensional space, and its rich modulation in time. This is explained in eloquent terms by renowned neurologist Oliver Sacks who says that, “…what occurs linearly, sequentially, temporally in speech, becomes simultaneous, concurrent, multileveled in Sign… and what looks so simple is extraordinarily complex and consists of innumerable spatial patterns nested, three-dimensionally, in each other” (Sacks 1991:88). These insights were fundamental in the development of the Divine Sign Language Model (DSL), which has proven to be a fruitful model to use in an effort to understand what it could possibly mean when the Bible talks of ‘God speaking’ or of ‘God’s voice’. Through the application of the DSL Model, ten basic image-concepts have been identified in Genesis 1, which form the foundation to a relational theology of Genesis 1. en_ZA
dc.description.availability Unrestricted en_ZA
dc.description.degree PhD en_ZA
dc.description.department Dogmatics and Christian Ethics en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Rabie-Boshoff, A 2016, Seeing God’s voice in creation : a visio-spatial interpretation of Genesis 1, PhD Thesis, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, viewed yymmdd <http://hdl.handle.net/2263/61551> en_ZA
dc.identifier.other A2017 en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/61551
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher University of Pretoria
dc.rights © 2017 University of Pretoria. All rights reserved. The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria.
dc.subject UCTD en_ZA
dc.title Seeing God’s voice in creation : a visio-spatial interpretation of Genesis 1 en_ZA
dc.type Thesis en_ZA


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