Social participation in working-age adults with aphasia : an updated systematic review

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dc.contributor.advisor Kritzinger, Alta M. (Aletta Margaretha)
dc.contributor.coadvisor Pillay, Bhavani
dc.contributor.postgraduate Pike, Caitlin
dc.date.accessioned 2017-07-14T09:13:57Z
dc.date.available 2017-07-14T09:13:57Z
dc.date.created 2017-09
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.description Dissertation (MA)--University of Pretoria, 2017. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Background: A previous systematic review found limited data regarding social participation in working-age people with aphasia (PWA). This population has many roles to fulfill, that are negatively affected by aphasia. A review of recent studies may reveal more information on the challenges in re-establishing social roles and thus may inform treatment thereof. Method: The aim was to provide an updated systematic review on social participation in PWA under 65 years of age. Studies from 2005-2017 were searched from Scopus, Pubmed and Psychinfo. Search terms were derived from the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and the Aphasia- Framework for Outcomes Measures (A-FROM). Aspects of domestic life, interpersonal relations and interactions, education and employment and community, civic and social life were investigated. Results: From 2,864 initial hits, 11 studies were identified, all of which were on the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Level III of evidence. The studies indicated that participation in domestic life is reduced and PWA showed reduced social networks, loss of friendships and changes in the quality of marital relations. Few PWA returned to work or spent time on education. Limitations in community, civic and social life were noted and there were contradictory findings on the impact of contextual factors on social participation. There was an increase in research into contextual factors impacting on social participation in PWA and in the use of conceptual frameworks in the last decade. Conclusions: Social participation in working-age adults is limited across the social domains. While the ICF conceptual framework is increasingly used, no studies used the A-FROM. There is greater use of standardised assessments and larger sample sizes. en_ZA
dc.description.availability Unrestricted en_ZA
dc.description.degree MA en_ZA
dc.description.department Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Pike, C 2017, Social participation in working-age adults with aphasia : an updated systematic review, MA Dissertation, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, viewed yymmdd <http://hdl.handle.net/2263/61355> en_ZA
dc.identifier.other S2017
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/61355
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher University of Pretoria
dc.subject Aphasia en_ZA
dc.subject Social participation en_ZA
dc.subject ICF en_ZA
dc.subject working-age en_ZA
dc.subject Stroke en_ZA
dc.subject UCTD
dc.title Social participation in working-age adults with aphasia : an updated systematic review en_ZA
dc.type Dissertation en_ZA


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