Initial blood urea nitrogen concentration predicts subsequent blood urea nitrogen concentration in beef cows

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dc.contributor.author Tshuma, Takula
dc.contributor.author Fosgate, Geoffrey T.
dc.contributor.author Hamman, Robyn
dc.contributor.author Holm, D.E. (Dietmar Erik)
dc.contributor.other University of Pretoria. Faculty of Veterinary Science
dc.date.accessioned 2017-07-14T07:44:49Z
dc.date.available 2017-07-14T07:44:49Z
dc.date.created 2016-08-08
dc.date.issued 2016-08-25
dc.description Poster presented at the University of Pretoria, Faculty of Veterinary Science Faculty Day, August 25, 2016, Pretoria, South Africa. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract This study was performed to determine whether beef cows have an inherent ability to maintain their relative blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentration when cattle are exposed to varying levels of dietary nitrogen supplementation. Ten Hereford and 11 Nguni cows, aged between 2 and 16 years, were utilised in two crossover designs. In the first design, cows were exposed to diets containing normal and high crude protein (CP) levels. At the end of the first crossover design, cows received a normal diet for one week before commencement of the second design. In the second crossover design, cows were fed diets containing normal and low CP levels. Blood urea nitrogen concentration was measured 17-21 times (mean = 20) during the study. A linear mixed-effects model was used to assess whether baseline BUN concentration (measured one week before onset of the study) was predictive of subsequent BUN concentration in individual cows. The model was also used to assess whether any of the measured variables were predictive of subsequent BUN concentrations. Baseline BUN concentration was a significant predictor of subsequent BUN concentration in individual cows (P = 0.004). Other variables that were significantly associated with subsequent BUN concentration were breed (P = 0.033), the diet that the cows received before the current treatment (P < 0.001), treatment (P < 0.001) and the week during which sampling was performed (P < 0.001). Beef cattle appear to have an inherent ability to maintain their relative BUN concentration within herds despite changes in levels of dietary nitrogen supplementation. en_ZA
dc.description.librarian ab2017 en_ZA
dc.format.extent 1 poster: graphs, tables en_ZA
dc.format.medium PDF file en_ZA
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/61350
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Pretoria : University of Pretoria, Faculty of Veterinary Science en_ZA
dc.relation.ispartofseries Veterinary Science Faculty Day posters 2016 en_ZA
dc.relation.requires Abode Acrobat reader en_ZA
dc.rights ©2017 University of Pretoria. Faculty of Veterinary Science (Original and digital). Provided for educational purposes only. It may not be downloaded, reproduced, or distributed in any format without written permission of the original copyright holder. Any attempt to circumvent the access controls placed on this file is a violation of copyright laws and is subject to criminal prosecution. Please contact the collection administrator for copyright issues. en_ZA
dc.subject Nitrogen concentration en_ZA
dc.subject Beef cows en_ZA
dc.subject Blood urea en_ZA
dc.subject Dietary proteins en_ZA
dc.subject.lcsh Veterinary medicine -- Posters en_ZA
dc.subject.lcsh Urea en_ZA
dc.subject.lcsh Cows en_ZA
dc.subject.lcsh Nitrogen excretion en_ZA
dc.title Initial blood urea nitrogen concentration predicts subsequent blood urea nitrogen concentration in beef cows en_ZA
dc.type Presentation en_ZA
dc.type Text en_ZA


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