A critical zooarchaeological examination of animal use and processing at the Early Iron Age sites Le6 and Le7 in the Kruger National Park

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dc.contributor.advisor Antonites, Alex J. en
dc.contributor.postgraduate Grody, Evin Frances en
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-12T11:38:36Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-12T11:38:36Z
dc.date.created 2017-05-09 en
dc.date.issued 2017 en
dc.description Dissertation (MA)--University of Pretoria, 2017. en
dc.description.abstract Le6 and Le7 are Early Iron Age settlements located in north-eastern South Africa in the Kruger National Park. These two open-air sites, immediately adjacent to one another on the west bank of the Letaba River, likely date to circa 500-800 AD. The wild-dominated Le6 and Le7 faunal assemblages allow for a site-level examination of the treatment of wild species within the highly variable spectra of Early Iron Age animal use. Using previously unanalysed faunal material, this study moves beyond basic procurement interpretation to examine more than just the pure subsistence choices present at these hunting-dominated sites. Instead, new socially-focussed zooarchaeological questions are asked by coupling traditional morphological analysis with taphonomic analyses and theoretical frameworks of intensification. Through this, both the procurement and processing methods utilised at Le6 and Le7 are identified and the significance of these choices are discussed. The occupants at these sites showed an intensive preference for predominantly adult large wild mammals. These were then processed in similarly consistent manners, with explicit focus on the largest, most easily accessible muscle groups and in-bone fat sources. Among other factors, the scant evidence of cooking and signs of speed in processing suggests the majority of preparation was focussed not on immediate consumption, but possibly on secondary transport of the animal resources off these sites. Altogether, rather than traditional residential Early Iron Age sites, Le6 and Le7 are considered as repeatedly re-used, shorter-term hunting bases for intensified, and possibly specialised, large wild mammal-use a potentially new faunal use strategy and site type for the period and region. The socio-economic implications and potential drivers of these faunal choices are then considered within the broader context of the southern African Early Iron Age. The place of expanded zooarchaeological methods and theories in social archaeological questions and more emic lines of site interpretation is also introduced, here specifically presented in the context of re-exploring the role and significance of wild animals at two Early Iron Age sites. en_ZA
dc.description.availability Unrestricted en
dc.description.degree MA en
dc.description.department Anthropology and Archaeology en
dc.identifier.citation Grody, EF 2017, A critical zooarchaeological examination of animal use and processing at the Early Iron Age sites Le6 and Le7 in the Kruger National Park, MA Dissertation, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, viewed yymmdd <http://hdl.handle.net/2263/60362> en
dc.identifier.other A2017 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/60362
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University of Pretoria en
dc.rights © 2017 University of Pretoria. All rights reserved. The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria. en
dc.subject Archaeology en
dc.subject Social zooarchaeology en
dc.subject Early Farming Communities en
dc.subject Early Iron Age en
dc.subject UCTD en
dc.title A critical zooarchaeological examination of animal use and processing at the Early Iron Age sites Le6 and Le7 in the Kruger National Park en_ZA
dc.type Dissertation en


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