Microbial succession in white button mushroom production systems from compost and casing to a marketable packed product

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dc.contributor.author Siyoum, Nazareth A.
dc.contributor.author Surridge-Talbot, A.K.J. (Angela Karen Joanna)
dc.contributor.author Van der Linde, Elna J.
dc.contributor.author Korsten, Lise
dc.date.accessioned 2016-08-04T08:04:40Z
dc.date.issued 2016-03
dc.description.abstract The aim of the study was to investigate microbial succession in the mushroom supply chain from compost, casing to fruit body formation and mushroom growth to the point of harvested, packing and point of sale. The microbial population dynamics of compost, casing and mushrooms were determined using a plate count technique, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of 16S and 18S rDNA. Plating revealed greater abundance of bacteria, fungi and yeasts in mushroom compost compared to casing and fresh mushroom samples. The viable count method also showed that bacteria and yeasts increased significantly after harvest and during cold storage. Sequencing revealed a more diverse culturable bacterial population in casing and on the mushrooms than in the compost. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a general trend of grouping of species from the same sources. In contrast, a higher microbial diversity was recorded in compost when using the DGGE method, which reflects cultural and non- culturable microorganisms. For compost and casing bacteria studied using DGGE, several species formed separate lineages, demonstrating highly diverse communities in these samples. Fungi were shown to be less abundant and less diverse compared to bacteria and yeasts. The study provides baseline knowledge of microbial populations and -succession trends in mushroom production systems using viable and non- viable methods. The information provided in this study may be useful for microbial ecology studies and to identify and develop biocontrol systems for pathogen control during production or to enhance pinning stimulation by knowing when to apply Pseudomonas spp. to ensure increased yield. Finally an insight is provided into microbial survival during cold storage and marketing of mushrooms. Potential antagonistic populations known to prevent spoilage, quality deterioration and extend shelf life are listed in this paper. en_ZA
dc.description.department Plant Production and Soil Science en_ZA
dc.description.department Plant Science en_ZA
dc.description.embargo 2017-03-31
dc.description.librarian hb2016 en_ZA
dc.description.sponsorship This research was funded by the South African Mushroom Farmers Association (SAMFA), National Research Foundation (NRF) and the Technology and Human Resources for Industry Programme (THRIP) (a partnership programme funded by the Department of Trade and Industry and managed by the NRF). en_ZA
dc.description.uri http://link.springer.com/journal/13213 en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Siyoum, NA, Surridge-Talbot, AKJ, Van der Linde, EJ & Korsten, L 2016, 'Microbial succession in white button mushroom production systems from compost and casing to a marketable packed product', Annals of Microbiology, vol. 66, no. 1, pp. 151-164 en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1590-4261(print)
dc.identifier.issn 1869-2044 (online)
dc.identifier.other 10.1007/s13213-015-1091-4
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/56181
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Springer en_ZA
dc.rights © Springer-Verlag 2016. The original publication is available at : http://link.springer.com/journal/13213. en_ZA
dc.subject Agaricus bisporus en_ZA
dc.subject Bacteria en_ZA
dc.subject Casing en_ZA
dc.subject Compost en_ZA
dc.subject Fungi en_ZA
dc.subject Microbial succession en_ZA
dc.subject Yeasts en_ZA
dc.title Microbial succession in white button mushroom production systems from compost and casing to a marketable packed product en_ZA
dc.type Postprint Article en_ZA


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