Surface microbial ecology food safety and horticulture production assessment of pear fruit (Pyrus communis)

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dc.contributor.advisor Korsten, Lise en
dc.contributor.postgraduate Duvenage, James en
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-01T10:32:52Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-01T10:32:52Z
dc.date.created 2016-04-18 en
dc.date.issued 2016 en
dc.description Dissertation (MSc)--University of Pretoria, 2016. en
dc.description.abstract The World Health Organisation promotes increased consumption of fresh fruit and vegetables to address global health and nutritional challenges. Pome fruit are widely consumed and contribute to a healthy diet, therefore represent an important traded product. The South African pear export industry is ranked as one of the top ten international exporters of fresh fruit. The importance of retaining market access is thus important and compliance with international food safety requirements is essential. To the authors knowledge this is the first supply chain study that is focused on the microbial quality and safety of fresh pears in the postharvest environment. The findings in this study aid in a better understanding of the microbial dynamics of the fruit surface (carpoplane) and the microbial population shifts due to postharvest practices. Current national guidelines for ready-to-eat fresh produce place emphasis on bacterial loads and absence of selected foodborne pathogens. Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus were demonstrated to attach, replicate and survive on the pear carpoplane. However, on market-ready pears these foodborne pathogens were not detected. Analysis of the carpoplane dominant bacterial populations reflected both harmful as well as beneficial residential bacteria that are known to either have the potential to affect human or plant health, respectively. The study provides an overview of the pear bacterial biome and this information can be used in future regulatory adjustments for food safety assurance. An assessment of the current industry wide food safety management practices reveal that not all aspects of the food safety assurance systems have been effectively implemented at an appropriate level. en
dc.description.availability Unrestricted en
dc.description.degree MSc en
dc.description.department Microbiology and Plant Pathology en
dc.identifier.citation Duvenage, J 2016, Surface microbial ecology food safety and horticulture production assessment of pear fruit (Pyrus communis), MSc Dissertation, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, viewed yymmdd <http://hdl.handle.net/2263/53487> en
dc.identifier.other A2016 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/53487
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University of Pretoria en_ZA
dc.rights © 2016, University of Pretoria. All rights reserved. The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria. en
dc.subject UCTD en
dc.title Surface microbial ecology food safety and horticulture production assessment of pear fruit (Pyrus communis) en
dc.type Dissertation en


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