Intellectual property and access to medicines a comparative study of technology transfer laws and policy options for sub-Saharan African countries

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dc.contributor.advisor Cornelius, Steve J. en
dc.contributor.postgraduate Ofimboudem, Joelle Dountio en
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-14T09:45:05Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-14T09:45:05Z
dc.date.created 2016-04-14 en
dc.date.issued 2016 en
dc.description Mini Dissertation (LLM)--University of Pretoria, 2016. en
dc.description.abstract In the last decade, governments of different countries have promulgated or considered legislation aimed at promoting collaboration between research institutions and industries to ensure that research results fit into industries needs. These laws require research institutions to transfer technologies they develop to industry for further development, translation into tangible products, and commercialisation. In Sub-Saharan Africa where most countries are net importers of finished products, this model could play a critical role in stimulating research and development (R&D), boosting local technological development and entrepreneurship. This triple-helix model comprising: government which funds research; institutions which carryout research; and industry to which research of new technologies are transferred for further development and commercialisation, raises concerns like access to research results and products developed out of this collaboration as the stakeholders involved all pursue different goals. For instance, government in funding research institutions aims to boost research and consequently technological development. Research institutions aim to create and disseminate knowledge, and publish as soon as possible. Meanwhile, industries aim to keep inventions secret, and create monopolies through intellectual property protection to maximise profits. This research provides an analysis of selected legislation aimed at promoting collaboration between research institutions and industries, and potential implications for access to pharmaceutical products developed out of intellectual property emanating from government-funded research. It also provides policy options for other African countries seeking to stimulate R&D at research institutions, technology transfer to industry partners, and local technological development in the biopharmaceutical technology industry while taking into account the differing goals of the parties involved. en
dc.description.availability Unrestricted en
dc.description.degree LLM en
dc.description.department Private Law en
dc.identifier.citation Ofimboudem, JD 2016, Intellectual property and access to medicines a comparative study of technology transfer laws and policy options for sub-Saharan African countries, LLM Mini Dissertation, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, viewed yymmdd <http://hdl.handle.net/2263/53124> en
dc.identifier.other A2016 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/53124
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University of Pretoria en_ZA
dc.rights © 2016 University of Pretoria. All rights reserved. The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria. en
dc.subject UCTD en
dc.title Intellectual property and access to medicines a comparative study of technology transfer laws and policy options for sub-Saharan African countries en
dc.type Mini Dissertation en


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