The impact of mandatory audit relief on the audit practice

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dc.contributor.advisor Barac, Karin en
dc.contributor.coadvisor Seligmann, J. en
dc.contributor.postgraduate Coetzee, Carla en
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-09T13:08:19Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-09T13:08:19Z
dc.date.created 2016-04-08 en
dc.date.issued 2016 en
dc.description Dissertation (MCom)--University of Pretoria, 2016. en
dc.description.abstract The South African Companies Act 71 of 2008, which came into effect on 1 May 2011, legislated that the financial statements of all public companies and state-owned companies should be audited annually but stipulated that the financial statements of private companies and personal liability companies are only subject to audit if an audit is in the public interest. As a result, certain companies are relieved from mandatory annual audits. This change in regulation had a direct impact on the audit practice, in particular on small and medium-sized audit practices since many of their clients no longer required an audit. This study determined the impact of mandatory audit relief on small and mediumsized audit practices in South Africa with reference to the need for an audit, organisational arrangements, social factors, technology, physical settings, organisational performance, and sustainability. A qualitative research approach was used in this study with constructivism as a philosophical worldview. For the purpose of this descriptive research a multiple-case study strategy was followed. The findings of the study showed a need for the audit of financial statements where an audit was in the public interest. Small and medium-sized audit practices participating in this study changed their goals and strategies as a result of mandatory audit relief with specific reference to a shift from audit services to other service offerings. As a result of the change in service offerings, the small audit practices and medium audit practices that participated in this study experienced an increase in staff with a lower level of qualification than in the past. Although several small and medium-sized audit practices experienced a decrease in the income from audit engagements, there was an increase in practice income from service offerings other than audits. It is clear that small and medium-sized audit practices participating in this study were challenged in their role as training offices for the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants and/or the South African Institute of Professional Accountants. Sole practitioners en
dc.description.availability Unrestricted en
dc.description.degree MCom
dc.description.department Auditing en
dc.identifier.citation Coetzee, C 2016, The impact of mandatory audit relief on the audit practice, MCom Dissertation, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, viewed yymmdd <http://hdl.handle.net/2263/53014> en
dc.identifier.other A2016 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/53014
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher University of Pretoria en_ZA
dc.rights © 2016 University of Pretoria. All rights reserved. The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria. en
dc.subject UCTD en
dc.title The impact of mandatory audit relief on the audit practice en
dc.type Dissertation en


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