Antenatal screening for hepatitis B virus in HIV-infected and uninfected pregnant women in the Tshwane district of South Africa

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dc.contributor.author Diale, Q.
dc.contributor.author Pattinson, Robert Clive
dc.contributor.author Chokoe, R.
dc.contributor.author Masenyetse, L.
dc.contributor.author Mayaphi, Simnikiwe H.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-06T16:57:29Z
dc.date.available 2016-05-06T16:57:29Z
dc.date.issued 2016-01
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND. Despite enormous strides in preventing hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, perinatal transmission still contributes significantly to HBV epidemiology worldwide; this could account for approximately 50% of chronically infected individuals. OBJECTIVE. To assess the need for HBV screening in antenatal clinics in the HIV/AIDS era. METHODS. This was a retrospective study conducted at the antenatal clinic of 1 Military Hospital, Tshwane, South Africa. Laboratory data for HBV, HIV and CD4 count were obtained and analysed for the period January 2008 - December 2013. RESULTS. A total of 2 513 patients’ results were retrieved and 2 368 patients were enrolled as both their HBV and HIV serology results were available. The mean age of participants was 29 years (range 14 - 46). HIV prevalence in this study was 20.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.189 - 0.222). The median CD4 count in HIV-infected patients was 522 cells/μL (interquartile range 370 - 711). There was an overall HBV prevalence of 0.8% (95% CI 0.005 - 0.011). The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) prevalence was significantly higher (2.1%) among HIV co-infected compared with HIV-uninfected patients (0.4%) (p=0.0001). Hepatitis e antigen (HBeAg) positivity was 30% in the HIV co-infected compared with 37.6% in the HIV-uninfected individuals (p=0.7400). CONCLUSION. This study showed a significantly higher HBV prevalence in HIV-infected compared with HIV-uninfected patients. The comparable HBeAg prevalence between the two groups indicates that both were at an increased risk of vertical transmission, therefore demonstrating a need for antenatal screening for HBV. Since antenatal screening is often not affordable in low-income countries, administration of HBV vaccine at birth is needed for prevention of vertical transmission. en_ZA
dc.description.department Medical Virology en_ZA
dc.description.department Obstetrics and Gynaecology en_ZA
dc.description.librarian am2016 en_ZA
dc.description.uri http://www.samj.org.za en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Diale, Q, Pattinson, R, Chokoe, R, Masenyetse, L & Mayaphi, S 2016, 'Antenatal screening for hepatitis B virus in HIV-infected and uninfected pregnant women in the Tshwane district of South Africa', South African Medical Journal, vol. 106, no. 1, pp. 97-100. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 0256-9574 (print)
dc.identifier.issn 2078-5135 (online)
dc.identifier.other 10.7196/SAMJ.2016.v106i1.9932
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/52536
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Health and Medical Publishing Group en_ZA
dc.rights © 2016 Health & Medical Publishing Group. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial Works License (CC BY-NC 3.0). en_ZA
dc.subject Antenatal clinics en_ZA
dc.subject HIV/AIDS en_ZA
dc.subject CD4 count en_ZA
dc.subject Hepatitis B virus (HBV) en_ZA
dc.subject Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) en_ZA
dc.subject Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) en_ZA
dc.title Antenatal screening for hepatitis B virus in HIV-infected and uninfected pregnant women in the Tshwane district of South Africa en_ZA
dc.type Article en_ZA


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