Beyond the wall : a study which explores the relevance of the enclosed garden as a landscape architectural type with specific reference to the City of Johannesburg

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Prinsloo, Johan Nel
dc.contributor.coadvisor Vosloo, Pieter Tobias
dc.contributor.coadvisor Young, Graham
dc.contributor.postgraduate Walsh, Abigail B.M.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-26T08:44:40Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-26T08:44:40Z
dc.date.created 2015
dc.date.issued 2015 en_ZA
dc.description Dissertation (ML(Prof))--University of Pretoria, 2015. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Creating sanctuary within an inhospitable world is one of man’s inherent needs. Even in the desert, Man’s sole means of survival is determined by whether he can find oasis: a fertile place within the vast expanse of the dry desert which provides the contrast of water and shade. In medieval times, Man feared the unknown world of the dense wilderness and used the enclosed garden – hortus conclusus- as a means to protect himself from nature and to create his own internal world of safety. Today, in the 21st century, Man is contending with the harsh conditions of the contemporary urban landscape: “a hybrid landscape in which the distinction between city and environs is erased” (Aben and de Wit 1999:250). which continues to develop horizontally and vertically. This contributes to presenting and creating fragmented and unstable conditions, which need to be addressed. Rob Aben and Saskia de Wit (1999) are authors of the book, The Enclosed Garden: History and Development of the Hortus Conclusis and its Reintroduction into the present-day urban landscape. Both writers believe that if the urban wilderness of today can be likened to the feared natural wilderness of the middle ages, then the hortus conclusus or enclosed garden typology could serve as a landscape design tool which provides man with sanctuary and relief from the city. The enclosed garden typology has withstood and transcended a variety of geographical, climactic and cultural conditions over many centuries. Its adaptability and survival lies in its ability to be the “mediator between dwelling and nature, building and landscape” (Baker 2012:22). Despite its relevance as an architectural and landscape design tool, it is not commonly considered for use in the present day practice of landscape architecture. Nor is it used by designers to solve the problems which exist in the current urban landscape. It is for this reason that Aben and de wit (1999) have thoroughly documented and analysed the development of the enclosed garden typology from its time of origin, to the present day. In addition to this, they have devised four new theories of enclosed garden typology (based on historical precedent), which they believe, provide suitable spatial design principles which can be applied to the contemporary urban landscape. The theory of enclosed gardens has validity due to the fact that it critiques the current urban environment. Investigating and testing this unfamiliar theory of enclosed gardens is thus a relevant topic for landscape architectural research. This dissertation will perform a series of spatial design experiments which will apply and test these theories in order to determine the enclosed garden’s relevance as a successful urban landscape design tool and whether it should be used in the context of Johannesburg’s open space system. en_ZA
dc.description.availability Unrestricted en_ZA
dc.description.degree ML(Prof)
dc.description.department Architecture en_ZA
dc.identifier.citation Walsh, AB 2015, Beyond the wall : a study which explores the relevance of the enclosed garden as a landscape architectural type with specific reference to the City of Johannesburg, ML(Prof) Mini Dissertation, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, viewed yymmdd <http://hdl.handle.net/2263/45281>
dc.identifier.other S2015
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/45281
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher University of Pretoria en_ZA
dc.rights © 2015 University of Pretoria. All rights reserved. The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria. en_ZA
dc.subject Enclosed garden en_ZA
dc.subject Urban activation en_ZA
dc.subject UCTD
dc.title Beyond the wall : a study which explores the relevance of the enclosed garden as a landscape architectural type with specific reference to the City of Johannesburg en_ZA
dc.type Mini Dissertation en_ZA


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record