Teaching Western classical piano music effectively in West Malaysia

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dc.contributor.advisor Panebianco-Warrens, Clorinda Rosanna
dc.contributor.coadvisor Van Wyk, W.
dc.contributor.postgraduate Ang, Kathryn
dc.date.accessioned 2014-08-18T07:05:02Z
dc.date.available 2014-08-18T07:05:02Z
dc.date.created 2014-04-16
dc.date.issued 2014 en_US
dc.description Dissertation (MMus)--University of Pretoria, 2014. en_US
dc.description.abstract The existing curriculum for piano lessons in West Malaysia is over-reliant on the syllabi of foreign examination boards resulting in a fragmentary curriculum which denies the student access to a wider range of musical experiences. The aim of the study was to identify and suggest solutions to problems by analysing the teaching approaches of piano teachers and to determine if there are elements which are lacking in the lessons. It also aimed to provide solutions by establishing a theoretical framework for effective piano teaching with optimal lesson plans. This study made use of mixed methods research design. A cross-sectional survey was conducted and data collection was by self-structured questionnaires. In addition, interviews were conducted for the qualitative component of this study. Twenty-five piano teachers with between one to twenty years of teaching experience were randomly selected to participate in the survey. A further fifteen interviews were conducted with teachers who were selected from the participants of the survey by purposive sampling. Interpretative phenomenology analysis was used to analyse the interviews in an effort to gain a better understanding of the nature and quality of the piano teaching in West Malaysia. The study finds that having piano examinations with regularity, usually on a yearly basis, has largely dominated the curriculum with examination requirements and has resulted in several elements being missing or absent in a typical lesson. Hence the situation is clearly not ideal as lessons are too examination oriented. Furthermore, students are generally not exposed to sufficient opportunities to display their skills and musical achievements. These findings suggest that Western classical piano music can be taught more effectively in West Malaysia if teachers re-think their approach to teaching in terms of planning for an optimal lesson. This would involve having both long-term and short–term goals in which a variety of strategies and important elements are incorporated seamlessly using the “simultaneous learning” approach advocated by Harris, Crozier and Ley. en_US
dc.description.availability unrestricted en_US
dc.description.department Music en_US
dc.description.librarian gm2014 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Ang, K 2014, Teaching Western classical piano music effectively in West Malaysia, MMus dissertation, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, viewed yymmdd <http://hdl.handle.net/2263/41371> en_US
dc.identifier.other E14/4//350/gm en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/41371
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher University of Pretoria en_ZA
dc.rights © 2014 University of Pretoria. All rights reserved. The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria. en_US
dc.subject Effective music teaching, en_US
dc.subject Simultaneous learning en_US
dc.subject Curriculum en_US
dc.subject Foreign examination boards en_US
dc.subject Mixed methods research en_US
dc.subject Interpretative phenomenology analysis en_US
dc.subject Western classical piano music en_US
dc.subject Approach to teaching en_US
dc.subject Piano examinations en_US
dc.subject Optimal lesson en_US
dc.subject UCTD en_US
dc.title Teaching Western classical piano music effectively in West Malaysia en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US


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