‘Roll-your-own’ cigarette smoking in South Africa between 2007 and 2010

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dc.contributor.author Ayo-Yusuf, Olalekan A.
dc.contributor.author Olutola, Bukola Ganiyat
dc.date.accessioned 2014-01-27T08:33:34Z
dc.date.available 2014-01-27T08:33:34Z
dc.date.issued 2013-06-24
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: The prevalence of smoking and consumption of cigarettes have decreased in South Africa over the last 20 years. This decrease is a result of comprehensive tobacco control legislation, particularly large cigarette tax increases. However, little attention has been given to the potential use of ‘roll-your-own’ cigarettes as cheaper alternatives, especially among the socio-economically disadvantaged population. This study therefore sought to determine socio-demographic correlates of ‘roll-your-own’ cigarette use among South African adults (2007–2010). METHODS: This secondary data analysis used a merged dataset from two nationally representative samples of 2 907 and 3 112 South African adults (aged ≥16 years) who participated in the 2007 and 2010 annual South African Social Attitude Surveys respectively. The surveys used a face-to-face interviewer-administered questionnaire. The overall response rates were 83.1% for 2007 and 88.9% for 2010. Data elicited included socio-demographic data, current smoking status, type of tobacco products used, past quit attempts and self-efficacy in quitting. Data analysis included chi-square statistics and multi-variable adjusted logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Of the 1 296 current smokers in this study, 24.1% (n = 306) reported using roll-your-own cigarettes. Some of whom also smoked factory-made cigarettes. Roll-your-own cigarette smoking was most common among black Africans and was more common among male smokers than among female smokers (27% vs 15.8%; p < 0.01). Compared to smokers who exclusively used factory-made cigarettes, roll-your-own cigarette smokers were less confident that they could quit, more likely to be less educated, and more likely to reside in rural areas. The odds of use of roll-your-own cigarette were significantly higher in 2010 than in 2007 (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.07-1.44). CONCLUSIONS: Despite an aggregate decline in smoking prevalence, roll-your-own cigarette smoking has increased and is particularly common among smokers in the lower socio-economic group. The findings also suggest the need for a more intensive treatment intervention to increase self-efficacy to quit among roll-your-own cigarette smokers. en_US
dc.description.librarian am2014 en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This work was carried out with the support of a grant from the American Cancer Society (Grant A0U146). en_US
dc.description.uri http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/13/597 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Ayo-Yusuf and Olutola: ‘Roll-your-own’ cigarette smoking in South Africa between 2007 and 2010. BMC Public Health 2013 13:597. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2458
dc.identifier.other 10.1186/1471-2458-13-597
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/33113
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_US
dc.rights © 2013 Ayo-Yusuf and Olutola; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License en_US
dc.subject Smoking en_US
dc.subject Roll-your-own cigarettes en_US
dc.subject Factory-made cigarettes en_US
dc.subject South Africa en_US
dc.subject Self-efficacy en_US
dc.subject Quitting en_US
dc.title ‘Roll-your-own’ cigarette smoking in South Africa between 2007 and 2010 en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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