Diversity and distribution of fungal endophytes associated with native Syzygium cordatum in South Africa

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dc.contributor.advisor Gryzenhout, Marieka
dc.contributor.coadvisor Wingfield, Michael J.
dc.contributor.coadvisor Slippers, Bernard
dc.contributor.postgraduate Marsberg, Angelica
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-09T12:20:00Z
dc.date.available 2012-12-14 en
dc.date.available 2013-09-09T12:20:00Z
dc.date.created 2012-09-07 en
dc.date.issued 2012-12-14 en
dc.date.submitted 2012-12-13 en
dc.description Dissertation (MSc)--University of Pretoria, 2012. en
dc.description.abstract Endophytes are organisms that inhabit plant organs and colonise plant tissues without causing obvious signs of disease. Much research has been done to elucidate the effects that endophytes have on their hosts, but the majority of these studies have been done on grass species that are considered model organisms. Evidence shows that endophytes evolved from closely related pathogenic fungi, because many endophytes are latent pathogens or saprobes that only sporulate when their hosts are stressed or dying. Hence, it is important to understand the principles surrounding endophyte biology and the effects that they could have on their hosts. There are specialised mechanisms involved enabling endophyte-host interactions to exist and these have co-evolved over millions of years. Endophytic symbionts affect the growth and fitness of their hosts, as well as their ability to tolerate biotic and abiotic stressors. In most cases, however, the ecological role and basis for the interaction between plants and their diverse assemblage of endophytes remain obscure and this is especially true for trees. Given the prominent presence of endophytes and the large part of biological diversity that they represent, further work to clarify these roles is urgently needed. This review aims to establish an understanding of the theory surrounding fungal endophytes, endophyte-host interactions, modes of infection, the influence of endophytes on their hosts, the co-evolution of life-history traits and why endophytes are important in their environments. en
dc.description.availability Unrestricted en
dc.description.degree MSc
dc.description.department Genetics en
dc.identifier.citation Marsberg, A 2012, Diversity and distribution of fungal endophytes associated with native Syzygium cordatum in South Africa, MSc Dissertation, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, viewed yymmdd <http://hdl.handle.net/2263/31509> en
dc.identifier.other E12/9/94/gm en
dc.identifier.upetdurl http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-12132012-104808/ en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/31509
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher University of Pretoria
dc.rights © 2012, University of Pretoria. All rights reserved. The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria E12/9/94/ en
dc.subject UCTD en
dc.title Diversity and distribution of fungal endophytes associated with native Syzygium cordatum in South Africa en
dc.type Dissertation en


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