The trauma caused by the Matebeleland massacre of 1982-1987 in Tsholotsho Zimbabwe and how the church can bring transformation using pastoral care

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dc.contributor.advisor Masango, Maake J.S.
dc.contributor.postgraduate Motsi, Raymond Givemore
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-09T12:12:19Z
dc.date.available 2010-10-13 en
dc.date.available 2013-09-09T12:12:19Z
dc.date.created 2010-09-03 en
dc.date.issued 2010-10-13 en
dc.date.submitted 2010-10-13 en
dc.description Dsecription (PhD)--University of Pretoria, 2010. en
dc.description.abstract This study was undertaken in order to research on the trauma caused by the Matebeleland Massacre of 1982-87 in Tsholotsho Zimbabwe. This dissertation is two pronged: one part is to ascertain the trauma in the community twenty years after and the second aspect is to suggest interventions that can be applied. The history of the country and the political background to the conflict is the most rational way to explain why this may have happened. This history has been used to justify the Massacre and is being used continuously even today by those in power. If people do not learn from their history they are bound to repeat it, (interview with Phineahs Dube 4/8/20080). Trauma has been investigated using a qualitative social reconstruction narrative theory by way of cultural world view and not medical psychological means. Investigating people’s painful experiences and emotions has not been easy. A suitable framework and trauma measure which are scientifically approved had to be found and used in order to validate and verify the results in a manner that the outcome can be accepted scientifically and internationally. Chronic ‘on going’ trauma or Long-term Psycho-social Crisis is the kind of trauma that the researcher has come up with if conventional medical jargon is to be avoided. The survivors can not fully comprehend what happened to them but the greatest injury and pain is caused by how the community as a whole was under threat of annihilation by the Gukurahundi, The name itself is infamous and points to the brutal nature of the operation of this North Korean trained army battalion known simply, as the 5th Brigade. The interventions suggested are psycho-social since the context is rural Tsholotsho Matebeleland, culturally, a socio-centric set up with in an African world view, (Mbiti 1969) and (Mugambi and Kirima 1976). The Church is proposed as the agent for change in the community as light and salt due to its proximity to the community. The interventions include funerals services and rituals, testimonies, and archival processes for the sake of prevention and collective memory. The psycho-social cultural approach takes the survivor from being just an individual with a personal problem to a collective memory of experience. (Becker 2000: 18) This gives practical theology an opportunity for a logical conclusion of all theologizing which is a theology of praxis or engagement. en
dc.description.availability Unrestricted en
dc.description.department Practical Theology en
dc.identifier.citation Motsi, R 2010, The trauma caused by the Matebeleland massacre of 1982-1987 in Tsholotsho Zimbabwe and how the church can bring transformation using pastoral care, PhD thesis, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, viewed yymmdd < http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-10132010-165758/ > en
dc.identifier.other D10/689/gm
dc.identifier.upetdurl http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-10132010-165758/ en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/31351
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher University of Pretoria en_ZA
dc.rights © 2010, University of Pretoria. All rights reserved. The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria. en
dc.subject UCTD en
dc.subject Psychosocial
dc.subject Peace-building and resilience
dc.subject Transformation
dc.subject Survivor
dc.title The trauma caused by the Matebeleland massacre of 1982-1987 in Tsholotsho Zimbabwe and how the church can bring transformation using pastoral care en
dc.type Thesis en


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