The possible effect of food supplements in the early grades on intelligence scores

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dc.contributor.advisor Bester, Suzanne en
dc.contributor.advisor Maree, Kobus, 1951- en
dc.contributor.postgraduate Feenstra, Carla en
dc.date.accessioned 2013-09-07T11:00:08Z
dc.date.available 2012-08-14 en
dc.date.available 2013-09-07T11:00:08Z
dc.date.created 2012-04-18 en
dc.date.issued 2012-08-14 en
dc.date.submitted 2012-08-13 en
dc.description Dissertation (MEd)--University of Pretoria, 2012. en
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a meal supplement fortified with micronutrients would, statistically, significantly improve the intelligence scores of Grade 3 and 4 learners. The data collection procedures in this study took the form of a pre-test – post-test control group design. The Paper and Pencil Games (PPG) Level 3, a standardised psychological test, was administered before and after the respondents were exposed to the meal supplements. For a treatment period of 16 weeks the experimental group received the meal supplement fortified with micronutrients and the control group the meal supplement without any added micronutrients. Data analysis took the form of statistical analysis to determine whether the meal supplements consumed by those in the experimental group could significantly contribute to improving their intelligence scores. The results indicated statistically significant increases in scores, between the pretest and post-test on the various scales of the PPG, of both the experimental and control group on the one hand, but no statistically significant differences between the two treatment groups on the post-test on the other. The null hypothesis that there are no (statistically significant) differences between the average post-test scores (V, NV, and T) of the experimental and control groups could not be rejected. However, the increase between the pre-test and post-test stanine scores of the two treatment groups has led to recommendations for further research. Copyright en
dc.description.availability unrestricted en
dc.description.department Educational Psychology en
dc.identifier.citation Feenstra, C 2011, The possible effect of food supplements in the early grades on intelligence scores, MEd dissertation, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, viewed yymmdd < http://hdl.handle.net/2263/27240 > en
dc.identifier.other F12/4/256/gm en
dc.identifier.upetdurl http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-08132012-110141/ en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/27240
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher University of Pretoria en_ZA
dc.rights © 2011, University of Pretoria. All rights reserved. The copyright in this work vests in the University of Pretoria. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of the University of Pretoria en
dc.subject Micronutrients en
dc.subject Psychological testing en
dc.subject Learner en
dc.subject Malnutrition en
dc.subject Cognitive development en
dc.subject The paper and pencil games level 3 en
dc.subject True experimental design en
dc.subject Pre-test – post-test control group design en
dc.subject UCTD en_US
dc.title The possible effect of food supplements in the early grades on intelligence scores en
dc.type Dissertation en


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