Asynchronous video-otoscopy with a telehealth facilitator

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dc.contributor.author Biagio, Leigh
dc.contributor.author Swanepoel, De Wet
dc.contributor.author Adeyemo, Adebolajo
dc.contributor.author Hall, James W. (James Wilbur), 1948-
dc.contributor.author Vinck, Bart M.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-20T06:38:36Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-20T06:38:36Z
dc.date.issued 2013-04
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVE: The study investigated whether video-otoscopic images taken by a telehealth clinic facilitator are sufficient for accurate asynchronous diagnosis by an otolaryngologist within a heterogeneous population. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A within-subject comparative design was used with 61 adults recruited from patients of a primary healthcare clinic. The telehealth clinic facilitator had no formal healthcare training. On-site otoscopic examination performed by the otolaryngologist was considered the gold standard diagnosis. A single video-otoscopic image was recorded by the otolaryngologist and facilitator from each ear, and the images were uploaded to a secure server. Images were assigned random numbers by another investigator, and 6 weeks later the otolaryngologist accessed the server, rated each image, and made a diagnosis without participant demographic or medical history. RESULTS: A greater percentage of images acquired by the otolaryngologist (83.6%) were graded as acceptable and excellent, compared with images recorded by the facilitator (75.4%). Diagnosis could not be made from 10.0% of the video-otoscopic images recorded by the facilitator compared with 4.2% taken by the otolaryngologist. A moderate concordance was measured between asynchronous diagnosis made from videootoscopic images acquired by the otolaryngologist and facilitator (j = 0.596). The sensitivity for video-otoscopic images acquired by the otolaryngologist and the facilitator was 0.80 and 0.91, respectively. Specificity for images acquired by the otolaryngologist and the facilitator was 0.85 and 0.89, respectively, with a diagnostic odds ratio of 41.0 using images acquired by the otolaryngologist and 46.0 using images acquired by the facilitator. CONCLUSIONS: A trained telehealth facilitator can provide a platform for asynchronous diagnosis of otological status using video-otoscopy in underserved primary healthcare settings. en_US
dc.description.librarian am2013 en_US
dc.description.uri http://www.liebertpub.com/products/product.aspx?pid=54 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Swanepoel, DW, Adeyemo, A, Hall, JW & Vinck, B 2013, 'Asynchronous video-otoscopy with a telehealth facilitator', Telemedicine and e-Health, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 1-7. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1530-5627 (print)
dc.identifier.issn 1556-3669 (online)
dc.identifier.other 10.1089/tmj.2012.0161
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/21124
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Mary Ann Liebert en_US
dc.rights © MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC. en_US
dc.subject Telehealth en
dc.subject Telemedicine en
dc.subject.lcsh Medical telematics en
dc.subject.lcsh Telecommunication in medicine en
dc.title Asynchronous video-otoscopy with a telehealth facilitator en
dc.type Article en


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