Experimental infection of common warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus) and bushpigs (Potamochoerus larvatus) with classical swine fever virus. II : a comparative histopathological study

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dc.contributor.author Gers, S.
dc.contributor.author Vosloo, Wilna
dc.contributor.author Drew, Tessa M.
dc.contributor.author Lubisi, B.A. (Baratang Alison)
dc.contributor.author Pardini, A.
dc.contributor.author Williams, Mark C.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-04T08:57:26Z
dc.date.available 2011-05-04T08:57:26Z
dc.date.issued 2011-04
dc.description.abstract Wild African Suidae, the common warthog (Phacochoerus africanus) and bushpig (Potamochoerus larvatus), were experimentally infected with classical swine fever (CSF) virus following the diagnosis of CSF subtype 2.1 in domestic pigs in South Africa in 2005. No data regarding the susceptibility or potential lesions of these African wild suids are available. Seven subadult warthogs and six bushpigs were captured and infected intranasally with the South African isolate. Two in-contact control animals of the same species in each experiment verified intra-species transmission. Surviving animals were euthanized after 44 days. Formalin-fixed tissue samples collected from them as well as animals euthanized during the trial were evaluated for histological lesions. The warthogs, which were clinically normal throughout the study, developed histological lesions that were inconsistently present and sometimes subtle. Three individuals, including one in-contact control, developed distinct lympho-plasmacytic cuffing in their brains. Subtle lesions included scant lympho-plasmacytic infiltration of various organs, occasionally accompanied by perivascular cuffing. In contrast, the bushpigs developed overt clinical signs similar to CSF in domestic pigs. Four of six animals, including two in-contact controls, died or were euthanized during the trial. On postmortem examination, intestinal necrosis and ulceration, purulent rhinitis and pneumonia were present. Affected animals developed lymphoid necrosis and depletion whilst surviving individuals showed perivascular cuffing in multiple organs. From the present work, we conclude that these wild Suidae are susceptible to CSF virus and intra-species transmission under experimental conditions can occur. en_US
dc.identifier.citation Gers, S, Vosloo, W, Drew, T, Lubisi, AB, Pardini, A & Williams, M 2011, 'Experimental infection of common warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus) and bushpigs (Potamochoerus larvatus) with classical swine fever virus II : a comparative histopathological study', Transboundary and Emerging Diseases, vol. 58, no. 2, pp. 135-144. [http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1865-1682/issues] en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1865-1674
dc.identifier.issn 1865-1682 (online)
dc.identifier.other 10.1111/j.1865-1682.2010.01191.x
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/16438
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Wiley-Blackwell en_US
dc.relation.requires Adobe Acrobat Reader en
dc.rights © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH. The definite version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com. This article is embargoed by the publisher until April 2012. en_US
dc.subject Wild African Suidae en_US
dc.subject Warthog en_US
dc.subject Phacochoerus africanus en_US
dc.subject Bushpig en_US
dc.subject Potamochoerus larvatus en_US
dc.subject Experimentally en_US
dc.subject Potential lesions en_US
dc.subject Swine fever virus en_US
dc.title Experimental infection of common warthogs (Phacochoerus africanus) and bushpigs (Potamochoerus larvatus) with classical swine fever virus. II : a comparative histopathological study en_US
dc.type Postprint Article en_US


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