Silver bullet or not? The impact of agricultural biotechnology on the right to food in Africa

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dc.contributor.advisor Eshete, Mandefro
dc.contributor.author Mwenifumbo, Anganile Willie Amon
dc.date.accessioned 2006-12-04T08:02:20Z
dc.date.available 2006-12-04T08:02:20Z
dc.date.created 2006-10
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.description Prepared under the supervision of Dr. Mandefro Eshete at the Faculty of Law, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia en
dc.description Thesis (LLM (Human Rights and Democratisation in Africa)) -- University of Pretoria, 2006.
dc.description.abstract "This study assesses the impact of agricultural biotechnology on the right to food in Africa and the multifarious implications of its introduction in Africa. It further explores how its negative effects can be mitigated whilst maximising its potential benefits to ensure food security, which is the foundation for the realisation of the right to food. The study also examines the differing and sometimes conflicting obligations of state parties to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR) to progressively achieve the full realisation of the right to food by making use of all available resources, the duty to make use of scientific konwledge in order to improve methods of food production and the duty to ensure that individuals enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications. The study analyses these obligations to futher explore the question whether African states have an obligation to immediately embrace agricultural biotechnology in order to ensure freedom from hunger, which is the first step towards the realisation of the right to adequate food. ... This study has five chapters. Chapter one lays out the context in which this study is set, the foucs and objectives of the study, its significance and other preliminary issues including the hypotheses, literature review and methodology. Chapter two is devoted to laying out the econceptual framework on which this study rests. Chapter three assesses the positive and negative impacts of agricultural biotechnology on the right to food. This chapter brings to the fore critical issues relating to agricultural biotechnology such as intellecutal property rights (IPRs), gene use restrictuion technologies (GURTs), erosion of biodiversity, enviornmental and health concerns that would impact on the realisation of the right to food. Chapter four analyses the differing international legal obligation of states relating to the right to food within the context of the debate on the introduction of genetically engineered (GE) seeds and crops in Africa. Chapter five presents the conclusions and recommendations of this study." -- Introduction. en
dc.description.uri http://www.chr.up.ac.za/academic_pro/llm1/dissertations.html en
dc.format.extent 277080 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2263/1225
dc.language.iso en en
dc.relation.ispartofseries LLM Dissertations en
dc.relation.ispartofseries 2006(20) en
dc.rights Centre for Human Rights, Law Faculty, University of Pretoria en
dc.subject Right to food en
dc.subject Socio-economic rights en
dc.subject Human rights en
dc.subject Hunger en
dc.subject Starvation en
dc.subject Nutrition en
dc.subject Agricultural biotechnology en
dc.subject Biotechnology en
dc.subject Agriculture en
dc.subject Farming methods en
dc.subject Food production Africa en
dc.subject Food production methods en
dc.title Silver bullet or not? The impact of agricultural biotechnology on the right to food in Africa en
dc.type Text en


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