HTS Volume 63, Number 4 (2007)

HTS Volume 63, Number 4 (2007)

 

HTS is fulltext available on Open Journals Publishing

Recent Submissions

  • Senokoane, B.B. (Tumi); Kritzinger, J.N.J. (Johannes Nicolaas Jacobus), 1950- (Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007)
    This article flows from the previous one, which analysed Karl Barth’s Tambach lecture in its original German context. It uses the musical metaphor of “remixing” to describe the recontextualising of Barth’s Tambach approach ...
  • Van Wyk, J.H. (Amie) (Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007)
    The author investigates some aspects of the ethics of the wellknown Swiss theologian Karl Barth. The article focuses on to the coherence between dogmatics and ethics, aspects of theocentricity and christocentricty, followed ...
  • Laubscher, Martin (Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007)
    This article investigates the specific nature by which Karl Barth could be considered as a public theologian in post-apartheid South Africa. The aim is to enrich the debate in the current field of public theology in ...
  • Neven, Gerrit Willem (Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007)
    This article is about doing classical theology in context. The weight of my argument is that classical text of Karl Barth’s theology is great intellectual text means: being addressed by this text in the context in which ...
  • Du Toit, Cornel W. (Cornelius Willem), 1953- (Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007)
    As an example of the context-relatedness of Barth’s work, this article compares his crisis theology with Heidegger’s philosophy of Being. Further examples are Barth’s reaction to the modernism of his time, with its accent ...
  • Kritzinger, J.N.J. (Johannes Nicolaas Jacobus), 1950- (Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007)
    This article analyses Karl Barth’s 1919 Tambach lecture on “The Christian in society” in the context of post World War I Europe. After describing Barth’s early life and his move away from liberal theology, the five sections ...
  • Van Wyk, I.W.C. (Ignatius William Charles) (Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007)
    The First Commandment played an important role in the theology of Karl Barth. His personal obedience to this commandment contributed to his realization that one cannot be comfortable with the Liberal theology of the ...
  • Bentley, Wessel (Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2009)
    As the Church is moving towards its 21st century of existence, it is confronted by challenges it has never known before. This changing world demands self-reflection within the Church. It has to consider its place, identity ...
  • Groenewald, Andre Johannes (Reformed Theological College, Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007-12)
    Karl Barth responded with his theology to Nietzsche’s dictum “God is dead” by stating that God is the living God. God does not need the human race to exist. God reveals God self to humankind whenever God wills. Barth ...
  • Van Aarde, A.G. (Andries G.); Pelser, G.M.M. (Gerhardus Marthinus Maritz) (Reformed Theological College, Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007-11)
    Karl Barth's hermeneutic legacy prolonged Western Christian tradition, especially influenced by Hegelian philosophy of history. This led to Barth's "theological exegesis" instead of a historic-critical exegesis. In a ...
  • Groenewald, Andre Johannes (Reformed Theological College, Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007-11)
    Karl Barth saw in natural theology a threat to the church of Christ. He was convinced that the so-called "German Christians" under the influence of the National Socialist Party practised natural theology. He advocated the ...
  • Dreyer, Yolanda (Reformed Theological College, Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007-11)
    This article is to argues that Karl Barth's revelation-based theology represents male bias entrapped within patriarchal Christian tradition. The rigid way of using the revelation-based model in exegesis and theology goes ...
  • Dreyer, Yolanda (Reformed Theological College, Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007-11)
    Karl Barth's gender perspective is often analysed with reference to his so-called "theoethics" or "creational theology". This perspective perpetuates an asymmetry in gender relations that was prevalent in Biblical times, ...
  • Dreyer, T.F.J. (Theunis Frederik Jacobus), 1946- (Reformed Theological College, Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007-11)
    Any tribute to Karl Barth as the most important theologian of the 20th century must show an awareness of the many facets of his work. He will long be remembered for his monumental contribution to church dogmatics. The ...
  • Veldsman, D.P. (Daniel Petrus), 1959- (Reformed Theological College, Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007-11)
    Can the great 20th century systematic theologian Karl Barth justify the fundamental beliefs he holds regarding the priority of God's revelation in Jesus Christ as put forward in his impressive and comprehensive Kirchliche ...
  • Van Zyl, F.J. (Francois Jacobus) (Reformed Theological College, Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007-11)
    This article focuses on Karl Barth's view of the human being as sinner. In accordance with his christological approach to all theological matters, the article aims to argue that Barth describes the image and character of ...
  • Van Aarde, A.G. (Andries G.); Pelser, G.M.M. (Gerhardus Marthinus Maritz) (Reformed Theological College, Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007-11)
    The article aims to explain Karl Barth's hermeneutical legacy against the background of the influence of the Enlightenment in philosophy and theology during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It consists of a discussion ...
  • Bentley, Wessel (Reformed Theological College, Faculty of Theology, University of Pretoria, 2007-11)
    The article describes briefly Karl Barth's views on church, its role in politics and how it relates to culture. This is done by identifying the way in which the church participates in the social realm through its relationship ...